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NFL playoff overtime format may change

INDIANAPOLIS — An NFL spokesman said Saturday the league could change its overtime format for playoff games at a meeting next month.

Under the new format, both teams would get the ball at least once unless the first team to get the ball scores a touchdown, Greg Aiello said. If the first team to get the ball makes a field goal and the other team ties the game, action would continue until a team scores again.

Under the current rules, the first team to score wins.

"There have been various concepts that have been discussed in recent years, but this one has never been proposed," Aiello said.

The competition committee will discuss the new concept with teams and players at league meetings March 21-24 in Orlando, Fla., when it could come to a vote. At least two thirds of the teams would need to agree to the changes for new rules to be adopted.

Bills decline to offer contract to Owens

Terrell Owens is on the market after the Buffalo Bills announced Saturday they do not plan to offer him a contract.

The Bills also declined to offer contracts to defensive end Ryan Denney and wide receiver Josh Reed, allowing them to become unrestricted free agents at midnight on March 5.

"We wanted to inform all three players ahead of the start of the free agency period so they could begin making their plans," Bills general manager Buddy Nix said. "We just felt that was the right thing to do. All three have represented our organization with class and we thank them for their dedication and hard work."

Final draft order

Coin flips broke three ties and finalized the first-round draft order.

Jacksonville will get the 10th pick, while Denver will pick 11th after 7-9 seasons. Tennessee will select 16th and San Francisco 17th following 8-8 campaigns. Atlanta will choose 19th, and Houston 20th after 9-7 finishes.

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