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Police investigate member of Roethlisberger's golf foursome for public urination

Ohio authorities investigated a complaint that a member of Ben Roethlisberger's golfing foursome urinated publicly on the Country Club at Muirfield course, but issued no citation.

Dublin police said Tuesday that the Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback wasn't the person who urinated behind a pine tree between the 17th green and 18th tee box of the course bordering the Jack Nicklaus-built course that's home to the PGA's Memorial Tournament.

Instead, it was one of three unnamed friends from Roethlisberger's hometown of Findlay, Ohio. The woman who complained, Nanette "Nan" Fowler, didn't want to press charges, said Dublin police spokesman David Ball.

"We spoke to the golf course (management), and they agreed to discuss this issue internally with their members," Ball said.

A police report said Fowler phoned the golf club, and then police, at 6:53 p.m. Friday to complain about a tall, white man wearing a blue golf shirt and khaki shorts who was "urinating into some trees." The report said a woman at the pro shop told Fowler "it was Ben Roethlisberger," although officials later disputed it was Roethlisberger.

Fowler didn't return telephone calls seeking comment.

Roethlisberger's group played through without meeting with officers. A golf pro sent to investigate the complaint did not locate the group. The club issued a reminder to members to use public restrooms.

Country club executives, Roethlisberger's agent Ryan Tollner and the Steelers declined to comment on the incident.

Roethlisberger has been under scrutiny for his actions since a Georgia college student in March accused him of raping her in a bar restroom. Detectives found no evidence to arrest him, but the incident caused NFL commissioner Roger Goodell to suspend Roethlisberger for up to six games.

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