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Redman gets short-yardage shot

» Former undrafted free agent Isaac Redman, who opened eyes when he excelled in the goal-line drill at training camp in 2009, will get the first shot to fill the role of short-yardage back. "We are going to give him the opportunity to see if he can excel," Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said.

» The roles for the running backs appear to be set, with the Steelers opening the regular season Sunday at Heinz Field. Rashard Mendenhall will start against the Falcons and also serve as the third-down back. Backup Mewelde Moore will spell him. Redman, who graduated from the practice squad to the 53-man roster, will be asked to grind out the tough yards when the Steelers need them most. "He's been very good in that area in the two-plus years he has been here," Tomlin said, "largely in preseason."

» Tomlin hinted that rookie wide receivers Emmanuel Sanders and Antonio Brown will battle this week in practice for a spot on the active roster Sunday. "Competition is the truest motivator," Tomlin said. "I'm going to hold my cards 'til the latter part of the week and keep those guys guessing a little bit." If Brown plays against the Falcons, he will return kickoffs and punts. If he is inactive for the 1 p.m. game, Moore will return kickoffs and wide receiver Antwaan Randle El will return punts.

» Jeff Reed will handle kickoffs against the Falcons, Tomlin said. The Steelers gave punter Daniel Sepulveda an extended look in that capacity during the preseason.

» The Steelers' six Lombardi trophies will be on display for a week at the Senator John Heinz History Center starting today as part of the NFL's "Back to Football Week."

Steelers president Art Rooney II, mayor Luke Ravenstahl, United Way president Bob Nelkin and Heinz History Center CEO Andy Masich will promote the celebration today at a 1 p.m. news conference at Heinz History Center.

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