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Six Steelers sit out practice

• Steelers defensive end Brett Keisel (hamstring), guard Chris Kemoeatu, tight end Heath Miller (knee), kicker Jeff Reed (illness), safety Will Allen (illness) and defensive end Aaron Smith (triceps) didn't practice Thursday. Keisel returned to action briefly against the Bengals on Monday after missing two games. If he doesn't practice today, he's unlikely to play Sunday night against the Patriots, along with Kemoeatu and Miller. Smith, who has missed the past two games, isn't ready to return.

• Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (foot) was limited in practice yesterday after sitting out with a foot sprain Wednesday. He also has an injured right shoulder, but that hasn't limited him this season. Other than missing almost all of the 2008 season with a torn ACL, Brady has played in every game since becoming the starter in 2001.

• Steelers wide receivers Mike Wallace and Hines Ward planned an elaborate end-zone celebration following Wallace's 39-yard touchdown reception against the Bengals, but common sense prevailed. "Me and Hines were thinking about it. But we didn't want to do it because it might hurt our team (because of a penalty)," Wallace said.

• Steelers defensive end Nick Eason said he's the recipient of the annual Ed Block Courage Award.

It's presented to a player on each NFL team who, according to teammates, best represents inspiration, sportsmanship and courage. Eason is playing this season despite nearly dying and losing 30 pounds after having offseason surgery to remove his appendix and part of his colon. "The things I went through, it was a unanimous vote to win that award this year," Eason said.

 

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