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Ward thinks Chung should be fined for helmet-to-helmet hit

• Hines Ward is well aware of the crackdown by the NFL on helmet-to-helmet hits. He has watched the video produced by the league on what is legal and what is a fineable offense. After getting knocked out of Sunday's game by Patriots safety Patrick Chung with an apparent helmet-to-helmet hit, Ward wondered Wednesday why Chung has yet to hear from the league about a fine. "I was falling down and I wasn't expecting to get hit," Ward said. "He hit me, and that is what caused the head/neck or whatever you guys want to call it. I don't know what the league wants. It is what it is. It was helmet to helmet, and I thought that is what usually causes a fine. I am not going to sit there and worry about if the guy got fined or not." Chung was not fined by the league as of yesterday, but the NFL usually doesn't make fines known to public until Friday.

• Guard Chris Kemoeatu went through practice yesterday for the first time since injuring his right ankle against Cincinnati. "I plan on going this week," Kemoeatu said. "It's my ankle. I took a little stuff for it and I think I'm ready."

• Defensive end Brett Keisel isn't as optimistic about his return. Keisel was limited in practice; he is still nursing a hamstring injury that has kept him out of three of the past four games. "I probably should've waited a little more last week," Keisel said. Keisel originally injured the hamstring against Cleveland and aggravated it two weeks ago against the Bengals.

• Sitting out practice for the Steelers were safety Will Allen (concussion), defensive end Nick Eason (illness), defensive tackle Steve McLendon (illness), safety Troy Polamalu (Achilles) and defensive end Aaron Smith (triceps), cornerback Crezdon Butler (quadriceps) and linebacker Lawrence Timmons (hip).

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