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Nice seat at the Super Bowl can be yours for $17,047

Ready for the next big game• Ticket sellers and Dallas area hotels are ready to accommodate Steelers fans eager to cheer on their team at Super Bowl XLV on Feb. 6 -- at premium prices.

The NFL Ticket Exchange at NFL.com had 729 listings on Sunday for Super Bowl tickets. The priciest, at $17,047 per ticket, was for first-row, midlevel seats on the 50-yard line in Cowboys Stadium.

The cheapest tickets, at $2,842 apiece, were top-tier end-zone seats. NFL.com sells tickets available for immediate delivery and tickets owned by a third party with a shipping date specified.

The league's listings are consistent with those at ticket reseller StubHub.com, where prices ranged from $2,683 to $15,120 yesterday.

Fans thinking about heading to Dallas can find package deals with hotel rooms and tickets.

Sports Traveler listed a four-night package at the Gaylord Texan Resort, with upper-level end-zone tickets, on its SportsTraveler.net website. Prices start at $5,695 per person. Touchdown Experiences at TouchdownHotels.com lists a four-day, three night deal at a Hampton Inn 11 miles from the stadium, with upper-level end-zone seats, for $3,895 per person, double occupancy.

As for airfare, US Airways was charging $604 with taxes and fees as of yesterday to fly to Dallas on Feb. 4 and return Feb. 7, according to Expedia.com.

The new $1.3 billion Cowboys venue could accommodate 100,000 people to mark the biggest Super Bowl attendance in 24 years. That includes several thousand Cowboys season-ticket holders who can pay $200 to watch the game on TV at a plaza next to the stadium.

The Steelers, the NFL and Pittsburgh police issued warnings last week to buy tickets only from authorized dealers such as NFL Ticket Exchange. Those who don't run the risk of buying counterfeits that are worthless at the gates.

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Steelers vs. Jets AFC Championship

Steelers vs. Jets AFC Championship

The Pittsburgh Steelers vs. the New York Jets in the 2011 AFC Championship at Heinz Field, Sunday, January 23, 2011.

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