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Steelers' Ward elusive about retirement

While visiting local students at North Hills High School in April, Hines Ward proclaimed he would retire if he won a third Super Bowl.

Nearly nine months later and on the cusp of another ring, Ward didn't exactly quash the idea that Super Bowl XLV would be his last game if the Steelers would defeat Green Bay.

"My mom asked me that the other day. I really haven't thought about it, to be honest," Ward said. "I don't want to make an emotional decision based off that."

Ward was part of Jerome Bettis' farewell five years ago when the running back announced his retirement after the Steelers' Super Bowl XL win over Seattle in Bettis' hometown of Detroit.

Ward, 34, holds 14 team receiving records, including most yards (11,702), catches (954) and touchdowns (84). He also was the Super Bowl XL MVP.

"I know Jerome went out on top and stuff like that," Ward said. "I really haven't thought about it. I just want to be singly focused on winning this ballgame and figure out what is going to happen after that."

Ward signed a four-year contract extension worth $22 million in April 2009.

The Steelers drafted Emmanuel Sanders and Antonio Brown in this year's draft and Mike Wallace in last year's. Wallace led the team in yards, receptions and touchdowns this past season.

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