Share This Page

Lawrence Taylor receives probation

NEW CITY, N.Y. — The teenage girl at the center of the sex-crimes case against football great Lawrence Taylor made a surprise appearance at his sentencing Tuesday, eager to declare that he should be behind bars.

She was denied the chance to speak in court, and Taylor was sentenced to six years' probation, as agreed when he pleaded guilty in January to sexual misconduct and patronizing an underage prostitute.

The former New York Giants linebacker must register as a sex offender, but a hearing on exactly how that will affect him was postponed to April 12.

The girl arrived with celebrity lawyer Gloria Allred, who described her as "a sex-trafficking victim." The girl, now 17, has been identified in court and by Allred only by the initials C.F.

Allred stood beside the girl at a news conference but later refused to reveal her name. She would not say whether the girl plans a lawsuit against Taylor but said, "We look forward to representing her as she continues her fight for justice."

She said Taylor "should be in the hall of shame, not the Hall of Fame."

The girl was 16 — under the age of consent — when she met Taylor last May.

Speaking outside the Rockland County Courthouse, she denied she was a prostitute and said another man, whom she called Rasheed, forced her to go into Taylor's Montebello hotel room by punching her in the face.

She said Taylor should have been able to tell she had been beaten and that she was underage.

"I believe Mr. Taylor could see my face and how young I was," she said. "I did what he told me to do because I was afraid what would happen if I didn't."

She added, her voice breaking, "I am upset that he will not go to jail for what he did to me."

The other man has been identified in a separate federal prosecution in Manhattan as Rasheed Davis, who is accused of acting as the girl's pimp and who allegedly assaulted her and brought her to Taylor's room at the Holiday Inn. Prosecutors have credited Taylor with helping them in that case.

Taylor said when he pleaded guilty that the girl told him she was 19. His attorney, Arthur Aidala, said Tuesday that Taylor "did not intend to patronize a prostitute who was under legal age."

He apologized on Taylor's behalf to Taylor's wife, family and fans.

Aidala criticized Allred for exposing the girl to the public eye, saying, "This young woman is being victimized once again."

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.