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Central Catholic star Bulger retires from NFL

Two-time Pro Bowl quarterback Marc Bulger has decided to retire after a 10-year career, according to a report on the Baltimore Ravens website Wednesday.

Bulger, a Pittsburgh native who played at Central Catholic and West Virginia, was an unrestricted free agent.

"I am grateful to all my former teammates, coaches and my family," Bulger told ESPN. "I have a special place in my heart for (St. Louis head coach Mike) Martz for giving me an opportunity."

Bulger was taken in the sixth round of the 2000 NFL Draft by the New Orleans Saints, but never played for them. He finished his career as a backup in Baltimore last season, but didn't play a down for the Ravens. He also spent two weeks on the Atlanta Falcons' practice squad in 2000.

Bulger, 34, spent eight productive seasons with the St. Louis Rams, passing for 22,814 yards and 122 touchdowns while earning Pro Bowl honors for the 2003 and 2006 seasons. He was the MVP of the 2003 Pro Bowl, and reached 1,000 completions in 45 games -- faster than any QB in NFL history.

His best season was in 2006, when he completed 370-of-588 attempts (62.9 percent) for 4,301 yards and 24 touchdowns, compiling a 92.9 quarterback rating. Bulger parlayed his success into a six-year, $62.5 millions contract extension with the Rams in 2007.

Bulger, who took some big hits while playing behind a weak offensive line in St. Louis, played a full 16-game schedule only once during his career.

There was talk earlier this year that he would sign to be the starting quarterback with the Arizona Cardinals, but the team instead acquired Kevin Kolb in a trade last week with the Philadelphia Eagles.

Bulger holds 25 passing records at WVU, including passing yards (8,153 yards).

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