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Josh Cribbs latest Brown sidelined by injury bug

BEREA, Ohio -- Three weeks into training camp, first-year Cleveland coach Pat Shurmur has yet to see his full team practice.

That's because the Browns are black and blue.

Injuries, several of them to key starters, have deprived Shurmur and the team's top decision makers from evaluating what the Browns have and what they need to contend again. And just when it seems the team is about to get healthier, wide receiver and star return specialist Josh Cribbs injured his hamstring near the end of Sunday's practice.

"I'm going crazy," team president Mike Holmgren said of the injuries. "I can imagine how Pat's feeling."

Since before Shurmur blew his whistle for the first time as a head coach, the Browns have been banged up. The club's medical checkup:

• Wide receiver Mohamed Massaquoi, arguably the top wideout on a team with questionable depth at the position, showed up Day One in a walking boot with a yet-to-be-disclosed leg injury. He hasn't practiced, nor has second-year running back Montario Hardesty, who is coming off knee surgery.

• Tight end Ben Watson sustained a concussion on the first day, and punter Reggie Hodges was lost for the season when he tore his Achilles in a non-contact drill a few days later.

• Starting linebacker Chris Gocong sustained a neck stinger and hasn't played in more than two weeks.

• Offensive guard Eric Steinbach missed a few days with a knee problem and then had his back tighten up last week. He hasn't been seen at camp in days.

• On Friday, star running back Peyton Hillis (hamstring), linebacker Scott Fujita (thigh) and safety T.J. Ward (hamstring) were among eight projected starters not to dress for an exhibition against Detroit. And then, tight end Evan Moore, perhaps the MVP of camp, left with a concussion after catching two touchdown passes in the first half.

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