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Steelers' Arians: No hurry for no-huddle

Bruce Arians is used to quarterback Ben Roethlisberger lobbying for the no-huddle offense.

The Steelers offensive coordinator said he hasn't abandoned the fast-paced attack as much as he hasn't quite reached a comfort level with it. Injuries are partly to blame, Arians said Thursday, particularly on the offensive line.

The Steelers have used six different starting line combinations this season.

"There have been a lot of interchanging pieces," Arians said. "We're not as coherent as I'd like to be with all 11 guys to run a lot of it, but we're capable of running it. And it may become a major force like it has in the past."

Roethlisberger said Wednesday he would like to go no-huddle more frequently than the Steelers have through the first six games.

The Steelers have employed their no-huddle twice this season, with Roethlisberger completing 6 of 13 passes for 86 yards.

Arians chuckled when asked if he has resisted the no-huddle because it takes play-calling duties away from him.

"No, I have all the trust in the world in (Roethlisberger) calling the plays," said Arians, who added the Steelers prepare to use a no-huddle in the third or fourth series of a game if they need it. "It's the other 10 guys in the huddle functioning properly at that speed. (Roethlisberger) can play that a whole lot faster than the other 10 guys. When I see everybody playing as fast as he does in the no-huddle, then I think we'll be more than ready."

Veteran receiver Hines Ward said "that's Ben and B.A." when asked his thoughts about the no-huddle.

"I just catch the ball when my number's called," the Steelers' offensive co-captain said. "I don't want to even get into that. It's not my say so. Whatever those two decide they want to do, then so be it."

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