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Kids briefs: Cooking and science combination at Phipps

| Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, 9:30 p.m.
Artist Felipe Dulzaides designed “Missing Links” — also called Rainbow Jumpy — a 30-foot, inflatable, rainbow-stripe tunnel where kids can run, bounce, walk and roll. It comes to the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh starting Oct. 6, 2012 Credit: The New Children’s Museum, in San Diego Calif.
Kids can learn about tree leaves at the Frick Art & Historical Center's program GreenKids: “Leaf Peepers.” Credit: Frick Art & Historical Center

Parents can enjoy a night out while the kids can be entertained and educated Friday at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens.

The event, “Evening Ed-ventures: Kitchen Creations,” from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., is designed for ages 6 to 9. The kids will participate in cooking-theme activities that feel like a science camp, with activities such as making repurposed kitchen tools, learning about kitchen safety, and cooking and eating healthy food. The kids also will explore the Oakland conservatory. Meanwhile, parents can do their own thing.

Cost is $25 per child. Registration is required.

Details: 412-441-4442, ext. 3925

A colorful connection

In a colorful, quirky new exhibit at the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh, kids can explore an inflatable rainbow that artist Felipe Dulzaides designed to teach kids about our connection to animals.

The “Missing Links” — also called Rainbow Jumpy — is a 30-foot, inflatable, rainbow-stripe tunnel where kids can run, bounce, walk and roll. An animated video at the front of the tunnel gives a playful lesson about evolution, and a documentary video at the end of the tunnel talks about our connection to and fascination with animals.

“Missing Links” is on loan from the New Children's Museum in San Diego, and stays at the North Side children's museum through Feb. 3. To celebrate its debut, the museum, on Saturday, will host the “We Can! Rainbow Bash,” which is part of the national “We Can!” program to promote healthy lifestyles with children. A Rainbow Dance Party with DJ Raw-Z will be from 1 to 4 p.m., and a class about how to eat a healthy rainbow of foods will be from 1 to 3 p.m. Kids can make tie-dye T-shirts from 1 to 3 p.m.

Activities are included with museum admission of $13; $12 for ages 2 to 18 and senior citizens.

Details: 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

Talking about trees

Kids can learn about autumn's hallmark, tree leaves, Saturday at the Frick Art & Historical Center, which will host the program GreenKids: “Leaf Peepers.”

At the free, walk-in family program, from 11 to 11:45 a.m. at the Point Breeze Frick, kids will explore and learn about leaves and other outgrowths from a variety of trees, including hemlock needles and giant palm fronds. Participants will explore the leaves found in the Frick's greenhouse and grounds, and make colorful leaf creatures in a take-home art project.

Details: 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

Music, lights with an eerie twist

The Carnegie Science Center in the North Side will celebrate the spooky season with a “Family Laser Halloween” show in the newly renovated Buhl Planetarium.

The show — which begins Friday and plays through Nov. 3 — will feature music from shows like “The Addams Family,” “Ghostbusters” and “Beetlejuice,” with spooky laser lights. Participants can do the Monster Mash and the Time Warp dance.

The show plays at various times every day and evening, and costs $8.

Details: 412-237-3400 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

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