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This is it: Mansion leased by Michael Jackson sells for $18M, once listed at $38.5M

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By Lauren Beale
Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012, 8:57 p.m.
 

LOS ANGELES — The Holmby Hills mansion where Michael Jackson lived at the time of his death in 2009 has sold for $18.1 million. The estate, recently priced at $23.9 million, had been for sale for as much as $38.5 million before the pop star took up residency.

Although it was purchased in the name of a trust, the buyer has been reported by several media outlets to be Steven Mayer, a senior managing director for Cerberus Capital Management. The sellers are Roxanne Guez and her husband, Hubert, chief executive of clothing manufacturer Ed Hardy.

The French chateau, designed by Richard Landry and built in 2002, features a theater, wine cellar with tasting room, elevator and a gym with spa. There is a guesthouse with stained-glass doors near the swimming pool for a total of seven bedrooms, 13 bathrooms and nearly 17,200 square feet of living space.

Jackson was leasing the 1.2-acre estate for $100,000 a month when he died after receiving the anesthetic propofol for insomnia. His doctor, Conrad Murray, was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter last year and sentenced to four years in prison.

The 50-year-old was preparing for his “This Is It” concert tour during his time living in the mansion.

Estate once Disney home

Investor and pro soccer team owner Gabriel Brener has listed his estate in Holmby Hills at $90 million.

The 35,000-square-foot manse, built in 2001, sits on a 3.6-acre site that once contained motion picture giant Walt Disney's residence.

The three-level mansion features a two-story oval foyer, statuary, wine cellar, movie room, three bars, library, gym, eight bedrooms, 17 bathrooms and two safe rooms. Staff quarters are accessible from a service entrance at the garage. There is a swimming pool with pool house, tennis court and putting green.

Brener, who owns the Houston Dynamos, heads Azteca Acquisition Corp.

In the early 1950s, Disney tinkered in a barn on the property, building a 18-scale train he named the Carolwood Pacific Railroad and giving the neighbors rides, according to Los Angeles Times archives. The barn was later dismantled and sits in Griffith Park.

Contact lauren.beale@latimes.com.

 

 
 


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