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Former Creedence frontman Fogerty gets a book deal

| Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012, 8:57 p.m.

Add one of rock 'n' roll's most-admired and most-uncompromising stars to the list of memoir writers: John Fogerty.

The former frontman for Creedence Clearwater Revival has a deal with Little, Brown and Co., the publisher announced Monday. The book is scheduled for 2014 and is untitled. Fogerty, 67, is known for writing and singing such classics as “Proud Mary” and “Bad Moon Rising” and for his clashes with band members and record executives.

“I want to tell the story of how I fought — hard — to maintain my artistic integrity in the face of opposing forces,” Fogerty said in a statement issued through Little, Brown and Co., which in 2010 published Keith Richards' million-selling “Life.”

Creedence Clearwater is widely regarded as one of the great American rock bands, defying the trend of long jams in the late 1960s and early '70s and turning out an amazing run of tight, Top-10 singles. But the righteous edge to Fogerty's vocals and lyrics was matched by his determination to have his way, including with his brother and fellow Creedence performer, Tom Fogerty. By the mid-'70s, the band had broken up and Fogerty would spend years battling his former music label, Fantasy Records.

His solo career has been sporadic, but he has had hits with “Centerfield” and “The Old Man Down the Road.” Fogerty has an album scheduled for next year and plans collaborations with the Foo Fighters and Keith Urban, among others.

“The kid from El Cerrito (Calif.) wanted to be the best musician in the world — my promise to myself,” Fogerty said in his statement. “I accomplished that goal against all odds, only to have it fall apart on top of me. The songs and the music stopped; you didn't hear from John Fogerty for years. All of this took its toll on me. I couldn't write a song, sing a song. And it was so hard on me, all of the lawsuits and betrayals. I was personally fading away. My story will share the ups and downs and how it all affected me. The road back was a bumpy one, and I knew that it would take years to come out of it, but I did. Happily, I did, with my dear wife, Julie, by my side.

“I have come to a place where I can look back and reflect on those stories and share what really happened. I am the guy who lived it, and you will hear me tell the story for the first time.”

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