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A no fail method for Crispy Potato-Apple Pancakes

| Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012, 8:57 p.m.
Noel Barnhurst
Crispy Potato-Apple Pancakes with Maple Cinnamon Applesauce.

Potato pancakes are a wonderful dish year-round.

This version combines the Idaho russet with diced apple. The starch and moisture in the russet potato help the pancakes keep their shape and fry crisply, while the apple adds a faint sweet flavor.

Crispy Potato-Apple Pancakes

1 medium-size onion, quartered

2 large eggs

2 medium-size baking potatoes, peeled and cut into 2-inch cubes

1 Gala apple, peeled and cut into 2-inch cubes

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

3 tablespoons flour

12 teaspoon baking powder

Vegetable oil for frying

Maple Cinnamon Applesauce (see recipe)

Sour cream, for serving

Puree the onion and eggs together in a food processor until smooth and fluffy. Add the potatoes and apple, and pulse until the mixture is finely chopped but still retains some texture. Add the salt, pepper, flour and baking powder, and quickly process to combine. Do not overprocess. Pour the batter into a medium-size mixing bowl.

Let the batter sit for 15 minutes, covered with plastic wrap to prevent discoloration.

Heat 34-inch of oil in a large, nonstick skillet on medium-high heat. Pour a tablespoon of batter into the skillet to test the oil. If it is hot enough, the pancake will begin to sizzle and brown. Spoon tablespoons of the batter into the skillet, making sure that there is a little room between each pancake. Flatten them with the back of a spoon and use the spatula to round the sides, if necessary. Fry the pancakes until they are golden brown on one side, and then turn them and brown the other side

Transfer the pancakes to a cookie sheet lined with two layers of paper towels. Allow the excess oil to drain. If serving immediately, place the pancakes on a platter and serve with Maple Cinnamon Apple-sauce and sour cream.

Serves 4 to 6 (makes 12 to 14 pancakes).

Maple Cinnamon Applesauce

3 Gala apples, peeled, cored and cut into 2-inch chunks

3 pippin or Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and cut into 2-inch chunks

6 tablespoons maple syrup, more, if desired

1 tablespoon cinnamon, more, if desired

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, more, if desired

Place the ingredients in a heavy, nonaluminum, large saucepan over medium heat. Cover and simmer for about 12 minutes, or until the apples are slightly softened.

Uncover and continue cooking, stirring occasionally to break up the large pieces, for 7 to 10 minutes, or until the apples are soft but there is still some texture.

Adjust the seasoning with more syrup, cinnamon and/or lemon juice, if desired. Remove from the heat, let cool, and chill before serving.

Makes about 4 cups.

Diane Rossen Worthington is the author of 20 cookbooks, and also a James Beard award-winning radio-show host.

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