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Kevin Smith brings humor, introspection to Music Hall show

| Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2012, 8:52 p.m.
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Kevin Smith attends The Paley Center for Media's Annual Los Angeles Benefit at The Rooftop Of The Lot on October 22, 2012 in West Hollywood, Calif. Frederick M. Brown | Getty Images

If this movie thing doesn't work out, Kevin Smith should consider stand-up comedy. Although his recent movies haven't met with much success (critically or financially), he has a very sturdy cult following, that counts many Hollywood stars and local Pittsburghers among its adherents.

The New Jersey filmmaker's ultra-low-budget debut “Clerks” (1994) played a big part in the independent filmmaking boom of the 1990s, and Smith's simple technique and dialogue-heavy style was a huge influence on filmmaking at the time. In person, he's remarkably self-deprecating and self-aware, with a great sense of comic timing, which he'll likely show off when he comes to the Carnegie Library Music Hall of Homestead on Saturday night.

In fact, he's kind of building a comedy brand beyond making raunchy romantic comedies for (mostly) dudes. His online podcasting empire (www.smodcast.com) and TV show “Comic Book Men” proves that he has in-front-of-the-camera (and microphone) talent.

The New Jersey-based filmmaker has made two movies in Pittsburgh — “Dogma” (1999) and “Zack and Miri Make a Porno” (2008) — so, expect some local stories about antics during the filming. At the wrap party for “Zack and Miri Make a Porno,” he did his version of a stand-up set, and held his own with stars like Seth Rogen and Craig Robinson.

Smith is known for doing long, question-and-answer sessions, with lots of audience interaction, film clips and the occasional verbal takedown of a heckler or two — though those are rarer these days, as his audience becomes more stacked toward super-fans. He has five “An Evening with Kevin Smith” DVDs, so there's always a chance he'll be recording for a future release. Expect some comic book talk, too — Smith owns a comic book shop in Red Bank, N.J., where “Comic Book Men” is set. The reality TV show is in its second season on AMC. It airs at 11:30 p.m. Sundays.

There also may be some hockey-related commiseration, as the hardcore New Jersey Devils fan finally has something in common with Pens fans — rage/despair at the NHL lockout.

Michael Machosky is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-320-7901 or mmachosky@tribweb.com

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