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'Don't let' your kids miss Mo Willems' exhibit at Children's Museum of Pittsburgh

Mary Pickels
| Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018, 12:36 p.m.
Popular children's author Mo Willems is working with the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh on an interactive exhibit set to open Feb. 17.
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Popular children's author Mo Willems is working with the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh on an interactive exhibit set to open Feb. 17.
'The Pigeon Comes to Pittsburgh: A Mo Willems Exhibit' featuring some of the popular children's author's most beloved characters, will allow little ones hands-on activities, including writing thank you notes and drawing along with Willems through videos.
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'The Pigeon Comes to Pittsburgh: A Mo Willems Exhibit' featuring some of the popular children's author's most beloved characters, will allow little ones hands-on activities, including writing thank you notes and drawing along with Willems through videos.

The Children's Museum of Pittsburgh is opening a new, interactive exhibit on Feb. 17, featuring the work of popular children's book author and illustrator Mo Willems .

The temporary exhibit will include some of Willems' young (and not so young) audience's beloved characters, including best friend duo Elephant and Piggie, faithful companion Knuffle Bunny, and The Pigeon, the wily city bird best known for his antics in "Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!"

"The Pigeon Comes to Pittsburgh: a Mo Willems Exhibit," offers children a play-and-learn opportunity.

According to the museum website, activities include:

• Letting two young children on a two-sided phone booth talk in altered voices.

• Making Elephant and Piggie dance with old-time animation.

• Donning a wearable bus and taking a drive around the exhibit.

• Spinning the laundromat washing machine and uncovering Knuffle Bunny and other surprises.

• Dressing up your Naked Mole Rat and sending him down the runway for a one-of-a-kind fashion show.

• Stacking lightweight blocks to create a terrible monster or funny friend.

• Launching foam hot dogs at the Pigeon and playing the plinko game to give the Duckling a cookie.

• Creating art inspired by the work of Mo Willems.

The exhibit is co-organized by Children's Museum of Pittsburgh and The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art.

Details: 412-322-5058 or pittsburghkids.org

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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