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Books

GQ lists Bible among books to skip, draws criticism

Frank Carnevale
| Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 10:12 a.m.
A bible is seen in the History of the Bible exhibit during a media preview of the new Museum of the Bible, a museum dedicated to the history, narrative and impact of the Bible, in Washington, DC, November 14, 2017.
AFP/Getty Images
A bible is seen in the History of the Bible exhibit during a media preview of the new Museum of the Bible, a museum dedicated to the history, narrative and impact of the Bible, in Washington, DC, November 14, 2017.

The Bible made GQ's list of "great" books that you don't have to read, and some aren't too happy.

The magazine described the Bible as, "The Holy Bible is rated very highly by all the people who supposedly live by it but who in actuality have not read it. Those who have read it know there are some good parts, but overall it is certainly not the finest thing that man has ever produced."

Instead of the Bible, the editors offer "The Notebook" by Agota Kristof as a different option.

The magazine compiled a list of 21 books including "Lonesome Dove" by Larry McMurtry, "The Catcher in the Rye" by J. D. Salinger, "The Old Man and the Sea" by Ernest Hemingway, "Blood Meridian" by Cormac McCarthy, "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain, "The Lord of the Rings" by J. R. R. Tolkien, "Freedom" by Jonathan Franzen, and others.

GQ wrote that the list was put together because not all Great books have aged well, and they offered some other options to read instead.

Father Jonathan Morris, Fox News Religion Contributor, on Fox and Friends quickly called out the list as foolish and cited how well the Bible has continued to sell and be read.

Father Morris goes to say that the Bible is more than literature and that it's inspiring to Christians.

Other took to Twitter to share their disapproval of the list.

And most of the replies to GQ's Twitter slammed the magazine for include the Bible.

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