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'Political Suicide' won't disappoint

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‘Political Suicide'

Author: Michael Palmer

Publisher: St. Martin's Press, $27.99, 368 pages

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Jeff Ayers
Saturday, Dec. 22, 2012, 8:56 p.m.
 

REVIEW

Michael Palmer brings back his doctor-hero, Lou Welcome, from “Oath of Office,” to help a friend involved in a huge scandal in his new novel, “Political Suicide.”

Palmer writes terrific medical suspense, and he has thrown political intrigue into the mix with his last few books. While “Political Suicide” relies more on the thrills and the mystery, it still resonates.

Welcome receives a call from Dr. Gary McHugh. McHugh has been battling alcoholism, and Welcome has been his counselor and confidante. McHugh needs help. He had just visited a congressman on the House Armed Services Committee and woke up with his car wrapped around a tree. The medics on the scene believe he's drunk. To make matters worse, the congressman is found murdered in his garage, and McHugh was the last person to see him alive. Then, the news leaks that McHugh was having an affair with the congressman's wife.

Welcome investigates and soon believes that his friend did commit the horrible crime. Then, he finds evidence of a conspiracy that has terrifying ramifications for the United States and its political future.

Palmer's novels examine issues and causes, but to mention the subplot in “Political Suicide” that discusses a decidedly moral dilemma would be criminal — and would give away a huge chunk of the surprises that follow.

Fans won't be disappointed, and Palmer can add another best-seller to his list.

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