Share This Page

Cussler's latest Fargo novel is good read

| Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, 5:47 p.m.

The Clive Cussler empire expands with another title in the Sam and Remi Fargo series. Co-written with Thomas Perry, “The Mayan Secrets” is also the best of the series so far.

The Fargo husband-and-wife treasure-hunting duo have had success in finding lost treasures. They have plenty of money and don't have to worry about day jobs or spending a month at a time away from home. So when an earthquake hits a section of Mexico, they feel compelled to supply humanitarian aid.

While giving their assistance, they stumble on an ancient Mayan artifact. This sealed pot clutched in the hands of a skeleton clearly has significance, and to make sure it's not damaged or lost in the cleanup, Sam and Remi have it shipped to their home in San Diego with the assurance they will give it back to the Mexican government.

When they open the pot, they discover a book that contains information about the Mayan culture. Word spreads of their find, and soon a woman arrives on their doorstep demanding the book.

The Fargo series has been the forgotten child of the various series that Cussler writes with several co-authors. This time, the story and characters gel into an adventure that feels like Cussler's Dirk Pitt adventures.

Perry has written many terrific novels, and it's understandable why Cussler would want to write with him. Their first collaboration was spotty at best, but this time, they've found their groove, and the end result is a blast.

Jeff Ayers is a staff writer for the Associated Press.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.