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'Fixer Upper' stars Chip and Joanna Gaines are having baby No. 5

| Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018, 9:33 a.m.
In this March 29, 2016, file photo, Joanna Gaines, left, and Chip Gaines pose for a portrait to promote their home improvement show, 'Fixer Upper,' on HGTV in New York. In an interview with People magazine released on Oct. 11, 2017, the couple cited a grueling 11-month production schedule as a reason for the show’s end. (Photo by Brian Ach/Invision/AP, File)
Brian Ach/Invision/AP
In this March 29, 2016, file photo, Joanna Gaines, left, and Chip Gaines pose for a portrait to promote their home improvement show, 'Fixer Upper,' on HGTV in New York. In an interview with People magazine released on Oct. 11, 2017, the couple cited a grueling 11-month production schedule as a reason for the show’s end. (Photo by Brian Ach/Invision/AP, File)

On Tuesday night, HGTV aired the latest installment of "Fixer Upper" starring the ever-popular Chip and Joanna Gaines. Afterward, Chip turned to social media to announce that the couple is expecting.

Chip 43, and Joanna, 39 are already the proud parents of Drake, 12; Ella, 11; Duke 9 and Emmie, 7, who appear on their show, which is based in Waco, Texas.

On Instagram, Chip wrote: "Gaines party of 7. (If you are still confused. WE ARE PREGNANT)."

On Twitter, he bordered on TMI: "You might recall a few months back. the ever amazing, ever romantic @JOHNNYSWIM was in Waco," he wrote of the Los Angeles-based musical duo. "And they put on a little too romantic of a concert ... anyways, one thing led to another, & we are officially pregnant. And I could not be more EXCITED!"

The announcement came after an episode in which the couple fixed up a house for Joanna's sister and her husband, who are expecting their sixth child.

This is the fifth and final season for "Fixer Upper." The couple stunned their fans in September by announcing in a blog post that they were ending the show, which has been a ratings bonanza for HGTV.

"It is with both sadness and expectation that we share the news that Season 5 of Fixer Upper will be our last," they wrote on their blog. "While we are confident that this is the right choice for us, it has for sure not been an easy one to come to terms with. Our family has grown up alongside yours, and we have felt you rooting us on from the other side of the screen. How bittersweet to say goodbye to the very thing that introduced us all in the first place."

Chip Gaines tweeted "What a ride ... BUT #season5IScoming#onelasthoorah

The family lives on a 40-acre farm outside of town. Their business empire includes: Magnolia Homes, a real estate and design company; a magazine and retail businesses such as Magnolia Market, which draws an average of 30,000 visitors to town weekly, according to the Waco Convention and Visitors Bureau. They've also written best-selling books, have a home goods line, including "Hearth and Home" at Target, a paint line and much more.

The conservative evangelical couple, both Baylor University alums, married on 2003. Ten years later, they launched "Fixer Upper," turning dilapidated houses into dream homes for buyers. Chip's goofiness and Joanna's down-home warmth made the show an instant ratings hit. And the popular couple became media darlings, gracing covers of magazines such as People.

In announcing the show's end, the couple said they wanted to focus their priorities on putting their the family first. Although they didn't say there were planning on expanding their family, they never shut that door.

Joanna told People magazine in June: "I would love another baby - or twins."

Chip echoed that sentiment in November.

"We had four babies right before the show started, and then we've had zero babies since the show started," he told Houston ABC affiliate, KTRK. "For me, I'm really excited to go back and try to maybe ... try to make some more babies."

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