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Volunteers sought for second round of Mt. Pleasant mural painting

Mary Pickels
| Tuesday, June 5, 2018, 2:51 p.m.
Shown is the mural design developed by Westmoreland County Community College art history professor Bernie Wilke, which is coming to life as part of community painting days, including a second scheduled on June 16, and will be mounted on the American Archetectural Salvage Building in Mt. Pleasant.
Bernie Wilke
Shown is the mural design developed by Westmoreland County Community College art history professor Bernie Wilke, which is coming to life as part of community painting days, including a second scheduled on June 16, and will be mounted on the American Archetectural Salvage Building in Mt. Pleasant.

A second community painting day for the Community Arts & Reintegration Project for Westmoreland County will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 16 at the American Architectural Salvage Building , 23 W. Main St., Mt. Pleasant.

The public is welcome to attend and lend a hand as a mural depicting the history of the borough, and designed by Westmoreland County Community College art history professor Bernie Wilke, comes to life.

A means of reintegrating juvenile probationers back into the community, the paint day is the culmination of several years of planning.

It is based on a similar program in Philadelphia, in which former inmates are provided temporary jobs producing murals.

The mural will be mounted on wood, on the side of the building facing the Coal & Coke Trail. It features well-known aspects of the borough, including the Doughboy which greets Main Street motorists, a salute to the town's glass manufacturing industry, the annual Mt. Pleasant Glass Festival, bicyclists, a train and beehive coal ovens.

Community members, project coordinators, college students, Boy Scouts and juvenile offenders participated in an April mural painting.

According to Tim Holler, project director and assistant professor of criminal justice at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, food, drinks and music will be provided to keep the painting process lively.

Participation requires no artistic skill, Holler says.

"This is a paint-by-number process, so anyone can participate, no matter what their level of artistic ability," he says.

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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