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Odd TV stuff in need of home

| Monday, Dec. 24, 2012, 8:52 p.m.

LOS ANGELES — James Comisar is the first to concede that more than a few have questioned his sanity for spending the better part of 25 years collecting everything from the costume George Reeves wore in the 1950s TV show “Adventures of Superman” to the entire set of “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.”

Then there's the pointy Spock ears Leonard Nimoy wore on “Star Trek” and the guns Tony Soprano used to rub out a mob rival in an episode of “The Sopranos.”

“Along the way people thought I was nuts in general for wanting to conserve Keith Partridge's flared pants from ‘The Partridge Family,' ” the good-natured former TV writer says of the 1970s sitcom as he ambles through rows of costumes, props and what have you from the beginnings of television to the present day.

“But they really thought I needed a psychological workup,” Comisar, 48, adds with a smile, “when they learned I was having museum curators take care of these pieces.”

A museum is exactly where he wants to put all 10,000 of his TV memorabilia items.

Finding one that could accommodate his collection, which fills two sprawling, temperature-controlled warehouses, however, has sometimes been as hard as acquiring the boots Larry Hagman used to stomp around in when he was J.R. on “Dallas.” (The show's production company finally coughed up a pair after plenty of pleading and cajoling.)

If he simply sold it all, he could probably retire as a millionaire several times over.

He won't even think about that.

“I've spent 25 years now reuniting these pieces, and I would be so sick if some day they were just broken up and sold to the highest bidder,” he says.

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