Share This Page

Wolf's 'Intercept' is compelling read

| Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013, 8:56 p.m.

REVIEW

Dick Wolf, creator of the popular TV series “Law & Order,” has jumped into the literary world with “The Intercept.”

Wolf makes it look like he's been writing novels his entire life. The tight prose, great characters and the intense twists are all signs of a master at work.

Flight 903 inbound to Newark makes history when a flight attendant and five passengers thwart an attempted hijacking. The plane lands, the hijacker is taken into custody, and the rescuers become instant celebrities. The job of uncovering the hijacker's motives falls to Jeremy Fisk, an NYPD police detective assigned to the Intelligence Division of the Joint Terrorism Task Force. Investigating with his partner, they uncover evidence that the hijacker was meant to fail.

While his partner tries to protect the heroes of the flight on their whirlwind tour of various media outlets, Jeremy tries to track down the real mastermind.

Wolf examines the obsession Americans have with instant celebrity and how that fame can both boost and hinder a person's life. And like a fly on the wall, he puts the reader directly into the minds of the police who work to keep citizens safe.

Readers will be clamoring for more adventures with Jeremy Fisk.

Jeff Ayers is a staff writer for the Associated Press.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.