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Entertainment briefs: Bricolage hosting political discourse

| Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, 9:11 p.m.

Bricolage Production Company and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh are teaming up for an evening of political discourse.

“Firefights and Foot Patrols: Documenting America's Engagement in Afghanistan and Iraq” will show a full-length documentary created by Bricolage that examines the human side of the Iraq War through the voices of Western Pennsylvanians serving as soldiers, government officials and journalists

Following the film, Carmen Gentile, foreign correspondent for USA Today, will lead a discussion and join with the film director's Ralph Vituccio to answer questions.

The event runs 6 to 8 p.m. Jan. 23 at Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown, as part of Bricolage's Fifth Wall series, which aims to break down the barriers between scripted storytelling and current events.

Admission: $20, includes refreshments

Details: 412-281-7970 or www.worldaffairspittsburgh.org

Old Economy Village open year-round

Old Economy Village, a Beaver County site usually closed for the winter except for staff and some volunteers, is now open year-round. Michael Knecht, site administrator for the Ambridge-based National Historic Landmark, agreed with board members from Friends of Old Economy Village that a year-round operation would benefit visitors by showing them how Harmonists lived during the cold months. Old Economy Village is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, and noon to 5 p.m. Sundays. Tours are at 10:30 a.m., noon, and 1:30 and 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays; and 12:30, 2 and 3 p.m. Sundays. The cost is $10, $9 for age 65 and older, $6 for ages 3 to 11, and free for children younger than 3 and active military members. Details: 724-266-4500 or www.oldeconomyvillage.org

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