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Kids briefs: Watch the penguins walk at the zoo

| Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Children can build their own trees at the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh’s Glow Trees event. Children's Museum of Pittsburgh
A King Penguin entertains visitors during a Penguin Walk at the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium Sunday, January 20, 2013. The walk is held with King Penguins, Macaroni Penguins, and Gentoo Penguins each January and February on the weekends when the temperature is below 50 degrees. Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review

People and penguins can get some much-needed winter exercise on weekends at the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, which is offering Penguin Walks at 11:30 a.m. Saturdays and Sundays through the end of February.

Cameras are encouraged for those headed to the PPG Aquarium, where visitors can line up along the outside sidewalk to see the penguins marching. Dwayne Biggs, curator of aquatic life at the aquarium, says outdoor walks provide penguins with good exercise and enrichment, and the birds get visual and physical stimulation with an environment they don't normally experience.

Penguin Walks are held on a weather-permitting basis, and are included with general zoo admission of $10; $9 for age 60 and older, and ages 2 to 13.

Details: 412-665-3640 or www.pittsburghzoo.org

‘Artisan' exhibit lets families make crafts

The Carnegie Museum of Natural History's temporary exhibit — “Empowering Women: Artisan Cooperatives that Transform Communities” — offers family craft-making activities on weekends.

The crafts, available to make from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, let kids and adults try their hands at some of the art projects they see in the exhibit, while teen docents and museum educators guide the visitors.

Participants can use a mini-loom, practice finger-weaving, tie a Turk's head knot, make a coil basket, and more.

Crafts are free with general museum admission of $17.95; $14.95 for age 65 and older; and $11.95 for ages 3 to 18 and students with ID.

Details: 412-622-3131 or www.carnegiemnh.org

Trees all aglow at Children's Museum

Kids can build a tree sculpture from twigs and conductive copper wire and mesh, then watch trees glow in a vacuum chamber, at the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh's Glow Trees event.

The event — from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday through Tuesday — is the brainchild of Mark Barlow and Kate Pfeil, who are among the North Side museum's F.I.N.E. Artists in Residence.

The artists harness a phenomenon called Bremsstrahlung, where halos and arcs of purple light and twinkles of bright green appear. Kids can sculpt a tree, see it glow in the chamber, and take it home.

Glow Trees is included with general admission of $13, and $12 for ages 2 to 18 and senior citizens.

Details: 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

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