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Hot Picks: Lots and lots of laughs with Louis C.K.

Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

Louis C.K., the man who takes the hypocrisy of modern life with shocking aplomb — and a few profanities mixed in — is bringing his in-yer-face comedy shtick Thursday to the Carnegie Music Hall of Oakland.

The son of a father with both Hungarian-Jewish and Mexican heritage is an award-winning film and TV writer who has made a career of bluntly exposing the humor of people's faults and shortcomings. He is the star, writer and executive producer of the Emmy-winning comedy-drama “Louie” on cable network FX.

Last week, Rolling Stone magazine dubbed him the funniest person currently working in show business. He bested Stephen Colbert, Tina Fey, Jon Stewart and the creators of “South Park” for the title.

Tickets for the 8 p.m. show are $42.86 and are available through the comedian's website, www.louisck.net.

— Chris Ramirez

MUSIC — SINK YOUR TEETH IN

It's not their fault that a Google search for Lumineers turns up a product billed as “The Painless & Safe Porcelain Dental Veneers” — and that ends up being a pretty good description of their music.

The Lumineers are having a moment right now, as their heartfelt, catchy folk/roots-rock begins its conquest of the pop charts, “Saturday Night Live,” and the hearts of music fans who require at least the occasional melody. No, they're not particularly dangerous or groundbreaking, but they clearly have other things going for them: instrumental chops, the charismatic voice of Wesley Schultz, and the confidence that they'll win over any crowd, on any stage, even on a pressure-packed gig like “SNL.”

The Lumineers will be coming to Pittsburgh for a show at Stage AE this Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m. The show's sold out — but hey, the Internet exists, doesn't it? Somebody's probably selling tickets somewhere.

Details: 800-745-3000; www.stageae.com

— Michael Machosky

THEATER — FROM ZERO TO FUNNY

The REP, Point Park University's professional theater company, takes a detour from its usual serious dramatic fare to perform Steven Dietz's comedy “Becky's New Car.”

In “Becky's New Car,” a middle-aged woman stuck in a middle-management job and a middling marriage shifts into the fast lane when a millionaire enters the car dealership where she works and presents her with an on-ramp into a new life.

The comedy plays Thursday through Feb. 17 in the Studio Theatre at the Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. Performances are 8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays.

Admission: $15 to $27. Patrons can take advantage of the “pay what you will” performance at 2 p.m. this Saturday.

Details: 412-392-8000 or www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

— Alice T. Carter

MAGIC — SLIGHT OF HANDHELD

For centuries, magicians have been blurring the lines between reality and illusion.

So what happens when a magician gets his hands on an iPad?

“Let's just say, you are going to see things done with iPads and iPhones that Steve Jobs never even imagined,” says Pittsburgh sleight-of-hand artist Paul Gertner.

His new one-man show, “BRAINDROPS: Mind Reading, Magic & iPads,” offers a magical look at new technology and poses the question: What is real and what is not? Gertner's performance examines the darker side of technology obsession and the need to balance technology with real-world human relationships and offers a few cautionary tales.

The show runs Friday through Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. Fridays and 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays at the Grey Box Theater, 3595 Butler St., Lawrenceville.

Children should be 10 or older to attend.

Admission: $20. Details: www.PaulGertnerMagic.com or 412-784-1115

— Alice T. Carter

ART — ALL ABOUT ANDY

Ever since Pittsburgh native Andy Warhol (1928-87) painted his first Campbell's Soup can in 1962, the world has never looked at Campbell's Soup, or art in general, the same. And not since then has there ever been an exhibit that explored Warhol's tremendous impact on the art world, and the world at large. That is, until now.

Opening Sunday at the Andy Warhol Museum, the exhibit “Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years” will explore to the fullest extent the influence Warhol has had on generations of artistic descendents through the display of approximately 45 works by Warhol, alongside 100 works by 60 other artists.

Warhol's interest in consumer goods, pop culture, filmmaking, magazine publishing and design is highlighted in this expansive exhibit (installed on four floors at the museum) through the works of such artists as Deborah Kass, Alex Katz, Jeff Koons, Robert Mapplethorpe, Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, Christopher Makos, Gerhard Richter, Cindy Sherman and many more.

The exhibits will remain on view through April 28. The Warhol Museum is located at 117 Sandusky St., North Shore, and is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays and until 10 p.m. Fridays.

Admission: $20; $10 children 3 to 18 and students with ID

Details: 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

— Kurt Shaw

MUSIC — MOE. FUN. MOE. JAMS.

The progressive rock band group moe., once described by Rolling Stone magazine as a “legendary jam band,” will play Wednesday at Stage AE, North Shore.

From their humble beginnings in the late 1980s as a bar band in Buffalo, the group has produced 17 albums, including 2008 “Sticks and Stones.”

Admission to the 8 p.m. show is $25 to $35.

Details: 800-745-3000; Information: www.stageae.com

— Chris Ramirez

MISC. — LASER SHOW ADDS MOTOWN AND MARLEY

The Carnegie Science Center on the North Shore is debuting a new lineup of laser shows on Friday. Laser shows, visual effects choreographed to popular music, are mostly on Friday and Saturday nights. Motown will be at 7 p.m., followed by Bob Marley at 8 p.m., No Doubt at 9 p.m., Nirvana at 10 p.m., Skrillex at 11 p.m. and “Midnight Floyd” (Pink Floyd). Motown also will show at 3 p.m. daily, and Bob Marley will show at 1 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. “Laser Gaga” (Lady Gaga), along with shows of Van Halen, AC/DC and Schism, ended their run last week. Admission is $8, and an additional laser show or Omnimax movie is available for $5. Details: 412-237-3400 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

— Kellie B. Gormly

MUSIC — GOSPEL-INFLUENCED COUNTRY AT THE ALTAR

Country music singer Craig Campbell — a Georgia native who cites Travis Tritt, Alan Jackson and gospel music as his influences — will perform Friday at the Altar Bar in the Strip District. Campbell made his debut with a self-titled release in April 2011.

The lead single, “Family Man,” reached the Top 20 and got good reviews. Campbell wrote each of the 11 songs on the album, which includes the second single, “Fish.” Campbell has played shows with Jackson, Willie Nelson and Lady Antebellum. The all-ages show begins at 7:30 p.m., and doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Tickets are $15 to $20. Details: 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

— Kellie B. Gormly

MUSIC — TRILLIUM ENSEMBLE PLAYS CRUMB

Music by ground-breaking composer George Crumb will be featured at the concert of the Trillium Ensemble on Saturday at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium, Oakland.

Violinist Dawn Posey will join the ensemble of pianist Katie Palumbo, flutist Deidre Huckabay and clarinetist Rachael Stutzman at this concert.

Music by Aram Khachaturian, Bohuslav Martinu and Frederico Garcia will be featured, with a continued presentation of John Adams' “Gnarly Buttons.”

The concert is at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $10; $5 for children. Details: 412-302-8233 or www.trilliumensemble.com.

— Bob Karlovits

HISTORY — CARNEGIE AND FRICK AT WORLD'S FAIR

A panel discussion on Andrew Carnegie's and Henry Clay Frick's inspiration from the World's Fair in 1893 will be held Sunday at the Frick Art Museum in Point Breeze.

The ideas brought about by the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago are considered in two exhibits: “Inventing the Modern World” at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Oakland and “Going to the Fair” at Clayton, the industrialist's home at the Frick Art & Historical Center.

Bill Bodine, director of the art center, will be moderator of the discussion, which will feature Dawn Reid, a curatorial assistant at the Carnegie Museum of Art; Rachel Delphia, associate curator at the Carnegie; Amanda Gillen, assistant curator of education and collections for Clayton; and Sarah Hall, director of curatorial affairs at the Frick.

The talk will be from 2 to 3 p.m. and is free. Details: 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

— Bob Karlovits

MUSIC — JAZZ AND OTHER THOUGHTS

Anne Smith, director of music at First Presbyterian Church, Downtown, sees jazz as good music to accompany a look into the soul.

For that reason, she and the church's pastor, the Rev. Tom Hall, have begun jazz vespers the last Thursday of the month through May.

“Hospitality is our goal,” Hall says. “If people choose to return for our services, we welcome them.”

This Thursday's vespers at 320 Sixth Ave. will feature singer-songwriter Anna Ciaccio and pianist Ginnie Campbell.

Besides jazz, there will be scripture readings and refreshments.

Vespers are 5 to 6 p.m. Admission is free. Details: 412-471-4495 or www.fpcp.org.

— Bob Karlovits

MUSIC — VIOLINIST PLAYS FOR CHAMBER SERIES

Erina Goldwasser usually plays in unison with her colleagues in the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra viola section, but Saturday night she will show her individuality in a recital with pianist Jerald Lee that is part of Chatham University's chamber music concert series.

Her program features Dmitri Shostakovich's last composition — his Viola Sonata, which was completed just weeks before his death in the summer of 1975. The three-movement piece was written for a dear colleague, violist Fyodor Druzhinin of the Beethoven Quartet, who participated in many Shostakovich premieres.

Other works Goldwasser and Lee will perform include Maurice Ravel's “Piece en forme de Habanera” and Mikhail Glink's Viola Sonata.

The concert starts at 7 p.m. Saturday at James Laughlin Music Center, Chatham University, Squirrel Hill. Admission is $15; free for Chatham students, faculty and staff.

Details: 412-365-1100 or chatham.edu/music

— Mark Kanny

MUSIC — NEW VIEW TRIO GETS TOGETHER

Percussionist George Jones and keyboardist Max Leake are frequent sidemen at any number of area jazz sessions, but Tuesday evening they will be leading their own gigs.

Jones and his New View Trio, which includes bassist Paul Thompson and pianist Alton Merrell, will play the weekly Happy Hour gig at the Backstage Bar, Downtown.

Thompson is scheduled to do double-duty as he then will join Leake, drummer Tom Wendt and trumpeter James Moore for the second session.

Jones and company will play at 5 p.m. and the Leake band will follow at 8 p.m.

Both are free. Details: 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org.

— Bob Karlovits

 

 
 


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