Share This Page

Aziz Ansari might bury you alive — with laughter

| Wednesday, March 27, 2013, 9:01 p.m.
Submitted
Ansari will put on his standup jacket and bring his “Buried Alive” comedy tour to Pittsburgh for one show on March 28 at Heinz Hall, Downtown.

Aziz Ansari is a comedian, actor, producer and writer. His career is flying faster than a sports car in a straightaway at Monte Carlo.

Ansari will put on his standup jacket and bring his “Buried Alive” comedy tour to Pittsburgh for one show on March 28 at Heinz Hall, Downtown.

He was raised by traditional Indian parents in Columbia, S.C., who were both in the medical field. Ansari caught the comedy bug when he was attending New York University, where he received his undergraduate degree in marketing.

He soon burst onto the American radar with his hit MTV sketch-comedy show, “Human Giant.”

After that, even his medically trained parents couldn't cure him of this comedy ailment.

Ansari has appeared in movies such as “30 Minutes or Less,” “I Love You, Man,” “Funny People” and “Get Him to the Greek.”

He has performed on all of the major talk shows. Rolling Stone magazine called him the “funniest person under 30” (an age he just hit in February). He also takes time to write and produce movies. He is currently working on a project with Judd Apatow.

And, of course, he's also one of the stars of the NBC sitcom, “Parks and Recreation.”

Despite this insanely busy schedule, he still takes time to hit the theater trail and tell some jokes on his new “Buried Alive” tour. Yes, Ansari is buried — in work.

What can you expect from an Ansari comedy show? Although he is short in stature, he is not short on opinions on everything that's wrong with the world. He may not cure it in an hour, but his injections of humor will certainly get the healing process started.

Don't let his calm, impeccably dressed demeanor fool you. Even though he looks like he might be ready to address the massive changes he made to the I.T. department, he will stun you with his sudden riotous abruptness. He lulls you into a sense of comfort with his expressive gaze like a king cobra then suddenly strikes and fills you full of comedy venom that convulses you with laughter.

Don't worry: You don't need an anti-venom; all you need is a ticket.

Comedian Matt Wohlfarth is a contributing writer for Trib Total Media.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.