Share This Page

Gail Pennington: 10 buzzworthy shows on midseason TV calendar

| Sunday, March 10, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

The idea of a TV “season” is getting blurrier by the year. Even on the broadcast networks, series now premiere not just in September but also in November, January, March and May. And on cable, of course, premieres are efficiently scheduled year-round, with one original series ending just in time for another to start.

March marks the beginning of network TV's traditional “midseason,” when failed fall shows have already made their exits and replacements are ready to go, getting a chance to catch on before the ratings-dictated season ends in May.

But cable certainly doesn't cede midseason to broadcasters, slotting series debuts and returns as well as big events now through May.

Here are 10 of special note:

• “Bates Motel,” 10 p.m. March 18, A&E. A “Psycho” prequel, this new series stars Freddie Highmore as young Norman Bates and Vera Farmiga as his mother.

• “Top of the Lake,” March 18, Sundance. Jane Campion directed this six-hour miniseries (which premiered to rave reviews at the Sundance film festival) in which a young police detective (Elisabeth Moss of “Mad Men”) investigates the disappearance of a pregnant 12-year-old.

• “Phil Spector,” 9 p.m. March 24, HBO. Al Pacino stars as the music producer, accused of murdering a young woman, in a docudrama with Helen Mirren as his attorney.

• “Game of Thrones,” 9 p.m. March 31, HBO. “Death is coming” in Season 3 of the epic action-fantasy.

• “Masterpiece: Mr. Selfridge,” 9 p.m. March 31, PBS. Jeremy Piven plays a brash American who teaches the Brits about merchandising in 1909 London in a 10-part historical drama.

• “Hannibal,” 10 p.m. April 4, NBC. In a prequel, Bryan Fuller (“Pushing Daisies”) takes on the story of a young FBI profiler (Hugh Dancy) who seeks help from a famed psychiatrist named Hannibal Lecter (Mads Mikkelsen).

• “Mad Men,” 9 p.m. April 7, AMC. Season 6 begins with a two-hour episode that has been kept, so far, mostly spoiler-free.

• “The Moment,” 10 p.m. April 11 on USA. Kurt Warner is host of a series giving people a second chance to pursue their dream careers.

• “Da Vinci's Demons,” 10 p.m. April 12, Starz. David S. Goyer is executive producer of a new series with Tom Riley as young Leonardo Da Vinci, “tortured by a gift of superhuman genius” and determined to expose the lies of religion.

• “Defiance,” 9 p.m. April 15, Syfy. In a post-apocalyptic place that used to be America, a frontier town rises over the ruins of a city that looks a little familiar — see that Arch? “We call it Defiance now,” a visitor is told.

Gail Pennington is a staff writer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.