Share This Page

Exhibit honors Hope, who made troops laugh

| Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, 7:58 p.m.

Bob Hope entertained 11 presidents at the White House, hosted the Academy Awards 19 times and told thousands of jokes to some 10 million U.S. troops over the course of four wars.

Now the long life and legacy of the beloved actor and comedian, who died 10 years ago at age 100, is being celebrated at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, where the World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum has brought the “Bob Hope: An American Treasure” traveling exhibition. The exhibit officially opens to the public Saturday.

The exhibit includes vintage photographs of Hope entertaining troops at USO shows overseas, an honorary Oscar statuette and PGA of America money clip. But the highlight is Hope's jokes, which are printed on displays and included in video clips throughout the exhibit.

“It was important to make it funny,” said Jack Peter, senior vice president of the World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum. “That was one of the requests of the family.”

And funny it is.

“I left England when I found out I couldn't be king” is the Hope quote in the section of the exhibit about his immigration to America from England as a young boy.

“He was very proud to be an American immigrant, that he was able to come here and succeed, and he wanted to give something back,” said Anthony “Tony” Montalto, Hope's longtime accountant.

There are pictures and jokes of Hope's time spent playing golf with presidents Dwight Eisenhower, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, Richard Nixon and others.

“He's played golf with more presidents than just about anybody,” Peter said.

“When I miss a shot, I just think what a beautiful day it is ...” Hope is quoted as saying. “Then I take a deep breath. I have to do that. That's what gives me the strength to break the club.”

The exhibit also captures Hope's appreciation for military service. There are pictures of him shaking hands with injured troops, some who had lost limbs but had smiles on their faces.

“I have seen what a laugh can do,” he is quoted as saying. “It can transform almost unbearable tears into something bearable, even hopeful.”

The exhibit will remain on display in New Orleans through Oct. 31.

Stacey Plaisance is a staff writer for the Associated Press.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.