Share This Page

Gary Owen jokes about his life in black and white

| Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Dog and a Duck
Comedian Gary Owen

Gary Owen burst on the comedy scene in quite the unconventional fashion by winning “The Funniest Black Comedian in San Diego” — even though he's white. This catapulted Owen to national fame by landing him an appearance on BET's “Comic View.”

Even though that's how Owen was discovered, don't be confused — Owen's comedy does not discriminate. He makes people of all walks of life laugh.

Owen, who will perform six shows this weekend at the Pittsburgh Improv, may be familiar to you from his roles on “House Of Payne,” or from his role in “Think Like a Man” or “Littleman.”

Coming up, Owen will appear in “Ride Along” with Kevin Hart, which will hit screens Jan. 17, and he just finished filming “Think Like a Man 2,” which will open in June 2014. In addition to that, Owen will be filming his third hour-long comedy special, called “I Agree with Me” in November at the Atlanta Civic Center. He took a moment in between flights to call to answer a few questions.

Question: How do you classify your comedy style?

Answer: Original, I hope. I'm telling the truth. It's basically my life on steroids. Like, people say, “No pot jokes?” I don't smoke pot, so no.

Q: Why do you think your comedy relates so well to an urban audience?

A: I think I've made appearances on black television shows, sitcoms. I'm married to a black girl, so they know I'm authentic (in) what I talking about. I'm not putting on act — I'm just being myself.

Q: How do you balance your comedy career with being a good father?

A: My wife does a good job of being there for the kids. My kids know this is what I do. For a long time, they thought I worked at the airport. This allows me to provide a good living, they go to private schools. ... When I'm home, I'm home. It's weird — I go from performing in front of 10,000 people to volleyball and basketball games.

Q: How do you generate your material?

A: I try to stay ahead of my specials. When it airs, I try to work new bits in slowly so before long I don't have any material on the special in my show. It doesn't happen overnight.

Q: What are you listening to on your iPod?

A: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis — I don't care; I like them. Justin Timberlake, “Holy Grail” by JayZ. That's music. As far as television, I love “Sons of Anarchy” and “Breaking Bad.”

Q: Being from Cincinnati, you have a little bragging rights now?

A: Yes, that was great. Oh no, I'm talking to Pittsburgh. That was terrible. The one thing about sports is I appreciate passionate fans and I tell people all over the country that Steelers fans are right up there as the best anywhere.

Comedian Matt Wohlfarth is a contributing writer for Trib Total Media.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.