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Movies/TV

WQED profiles Pittsburgh's transgender community in documentary

Mary Pickels
| Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, 10:57 a.m.
Pine-Richland seniors Elissa Ridenour (right) and Juliet Evancho talk together after their news conference with attorney Omar Gonzalez-Pagan Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, in Cranberry. The school district in 2017 settled a federal lawsuit brought by three transgender students seeking the use of restrooms corresponding to their 'consistently and uniformly asserted gender identity.'
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pine-Richland seniors Elissa Ridenour (right) and Juliet Evancho talk together after their news conference with attorney Omar Gonzalez-Pagan Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, in Cranberry. The school district in 2017 settled a federal lawsuit brought by three transgender students seeking the use of restrooms corresponding to their 'consistently and uniformly asserted gender identity.'
In this file photo, Danica Roem casts her vote at Buckhall Volunteer Fire Department on Nov. 7 in Manassas, Va. The Democrat defeated GOP incumbent state lawmaker Robert Marshall, making her the first transgender legislator elected in America. (Jahi Chikwendiu |The Washington Post via AP)
In this file photo, Danica Roem casts her vote at Buckhall Volunteer Fire Department on Nov. 7 in Manassas, Va. The Democrat defeated GOP incumbent state lawmaker Robert Marshall, making her the first transgender legislator elected in America. (Jahi Chikwendiu |The Washington Post via AP)

WQED will premiere a new local documentary, "Authentic Lives," profiling Pittsburgh's transgender community at 8 p.m. Jan. 25, with rebroadcasts at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 29 and 12:30 a.m. Jan. 30.

Discriminatory practices do not focus just on the restroom issue, one topic that resulted in a federal lawsuit in the Pine-Richland School District last year.

According to a news release, LGBTQ discrimination can range from education to employment, health care to housing.

Produced and written by WQED's Minette Seate, the documentary spotlights those working on behalf of the region's transgender population.

It also profiles transgender men and women as they define their lives while navigating an "evolving" city.

The piece will profile:

- how Pittsburgh rates when it comes to working toward equity and inclusion for its LGBTQ population;

- advocates who are dedicated to finding solutions for the homelessness many local transgender young people face;

- community activists fighting on behalf of transgender people of color;

- students and faculty who are helping to make history in Pittsburgh;

- health care and community providers who offer hope and help transgender people and their families.

Details: wqed.org

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

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