ShareThis Page
Movies/TV

Judge: Man accused of stealing Frances McDormand's Oscar will be released

| Wednesday, March 7, 2018, 6:01 p.m.
Frances McDormand accepts the best actress Oscar for 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' on Sunday.
Getty Images
Frances McDormand accepts the best actress Oscar for 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri' on Sunday.

LOS ANGELES — A lawyer for the man charged with stealing Frances McDormand's Academy Award said Wednesday that he and his client plan to “forcefully and aggressively resist” the allegations against him.

Attorney Daniel Brookman acknowledged that suspect Terry Bryant can be seen on an Associated Press video holding McDormand's best actress statuette but those images don't rise to the seriousness of felony grand theft.

“There's a big difference between holding an Oscar and what he's charged with,” Brookman said outside court, where Bryant was arraigned Wednesday and pleaded not guilty. “I don't think his character matches these charges.”

Los Angeles Superior Court Deborah Brazil ruled Bryant, 47, does not pose a risk to the public and said he will be released on his own recognizance.

Bryant walked out of the Governors Ball Oscars after-party with the trophy on Sunday night, authorities said. He was captured on the AP video holding it proudly over his head and saying, “All right baby boys and baby girls.”

He quickly gave it up when confronted by a photographer, police said.

McDormand, a Monessen High School graduate, won her second best actress Oscar on Sunday for her performance in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

Bryant could get three years in jail if convicted.

AP footage from earlier Sunday shows Bryant walked in to the Governors Ball alongside McDormand, although there is no indication they knew each other. McDormand smiled and laughed as she entered the party and her son carried her Oscar into the party, the footage shows.

Naomi Levy, a rabbi who came to court to support Bryant, said he is part of her spiritual congregation and never misses a meeting.

“He's a sweet and gentle man of faith,” Levy said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me