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NY critics name 'Zero Dark Thirty' best film

| Monday, Dec. 3, 2012, 8:51 p.m.
This undated publicity film image provided by Columbia Pictures shows elite Navy SEALs raiding Osama Bin Laden's compound in the dark night in Columbia Pictures' gripping new thriller directed by Kathryn Bigelow, 'Zero Dark Thirty.'

The New York Film Critics Circle named Kathryn Bigelow's “Zero Dark Thirty” the best film of 2012, voicing its strong support for the grimly journalistic Osama bin Laden docudrama.

Bigelow, whose “Hurt Locker” won best picture at the Academy Awards in 2010, also won best director in the awards announced Monday, and Greg Fraser won for the film's cinematography.

The critics group also cast a loud vote for Seven Spielberg's “Lincoln,” bestowing it with three awards: Daniel Day-Lewis for best actor, Sally Field for best supporting actress and Tony Kushner for best screenplay. Lewis' award for his performance as the 16th president is his fifth from the NYFCC.

Rachel Weisz earned best actress from the critics for her performance in the little-seen “The Deep Blue Sea,” a period drama by the British director Terence Davies.

The supporting actor pick went to Matthew McConaughey for his performances as a Texas district attorney in Richard Linklater's “Bernie” and as a male stripper in Steven Soderberg's “Magic Mike.”

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