TribLIVE

| AandE


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

REVIEW: 'Croods' lowbrow characters are modern 3-D Stone Age fun

‘The Croods'

★★★

PG

Wide release

By Roger Moore
Thursday, March 21, 2013, 7:24 p.m.
 

“The Croods” is the first pleasant surprise of spring, a gorgeous kids' cartoon with heart and wit, if not exactly a firm grasp of paleontology.

It's about a family of cave men and women who have survived, unlike their neighbors, by minimizing risk. But risk is how we grow, how we better our lives and achieve great things. That's just one of the things the Croods learn as their world turns upside down — literally. Earthquakes and volcanoes do tend to upend a neighborhood.

Daddy Grug, hilariously and sensitively voiced by Nicolas Cage, has just one motto, one he reinforces in their cave as he tells stories and animates his lessons on the cave wall: “Never be NOT afraid.”

His athletic daughter Eep (an energetic Emma Stone) may bristle at that as she invents rock climbing, parkour and assorted other dangerous sports while exploring their limited world. But fear has kept them all — Grug, Eep, mother Ugga (Catherine Keener), lunky brother Thunk (Clark Duke), Gran (Cloris Leachman) and feral baby Sandy (Randy Thom) — alive.

They hide in their cave at night, huddled in a dogpile. They only go out to feed. An epic egg hunt that opens the film shows what they have to go through just to eat. They basically invent football (and the way Fox Sports covers it) with this gonzo chase through the high desert.

But Eep has slipped out at night, lured by a strange light. Let's call it “fire.” She's also lured by the handsome lad who has fire. Let's call him “Guy,” given a typical wry and sarcastic turn by Ryan Reynolds.

Guy has a sloth he's tamed and uses as a belt, named “Belt.” He cooks. You know, because he has fire. He's got shoes. For your feet. Eep and Ugga go all Manolo Blahnik on those.

And Guy has a message, which everybody but Grug hears. “Our world is ending.” The earthquakes and eruptions mean they have to migrate, to move on.

The big lug Grug thinks “Ideas are for weaklings,” but he comes around.

The animation is first-rate, even if the cutesy critters bear the hallmarks of co-director Chris Sanders' “Lilo & Stitch” and “How to Train Your Dragon” — wide, round faces, big cuddly eyes.

Another Sanders touch? Emotion. For all the wisecracks about Grug wishing his mother-in-law dead, “The Croods” has a warm sense of family, responsibility and letting Dad save face.

And the actors are, to a one, dazzling — getting across emotions and delivering this very visual comedy's verbal zingers with great timing. Cage, Stone and Keener are naturals at this sort of acting.

“The Croods” aren't the Flintstones. But mercifully, they aren't living in the Ice Age, either. That makes the movie about them a welcome 3-D cartoon, the first decent kids' movie of the year.

Roger Moore is a movie critic for McClatchy-Tribune News Service.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Movies

  1. McCandless Cinemark set to open Sept. 19
  2. ‘Ghostbusters’ still ‘makes you happy,’ director says
  3. Small Pittsburgh theaters are big hits with movie-theme parties
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.