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DVD reviews: '6 Souls' and 'The House I Live In'

Wednesday, July 3, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

“6 Souls” (2010, R, 112 min., $24.98). Shot in and around Pittsburgh a few years back, “6 Souls,” which is also known as “Shelter,” took the long way to video. Julianne Moore and Jonathan Rhys Meyers are in lead roles for a picture that was shot in 2010, went through a limited theatrical release and is now available for everybody. The actors give “6 Souls” some star power while putting in solid performances, but there's only so much they can do to boost this thriller that blends psychologist serial killer talk with backwoods religion. Directed by Mans Marlind and Bjorn Stein off of a script from Michael Cooney, the film never finds its identity, and, in the process, adds up to lots of confusion. Moore plays a top-notch psychiatrist who's pointed toward a patient with multiple personalities. As she delves into Adam's (Rhys Meyers) case, she realizes all of his personalities stem from murder victims. When folks around her start dying, she realizes that solving Adam might be a little harder than she thought. “6 Souls” has nothing in the way of special features, but viewers will be happy about moving past this one when the credits start rolling. 1 Star.

“The House I Live In” (2012, NR, 108 min., $14.99). With additional focus on the wars overseas, immigration debates and healthcare, the war on drugs has been pushed off the front pages of most newspapers and websites. But, according to talented filmmaker Eugene Jarecki's “The House I Live In,” the battle is still going strong. In one of the most important documentaries of the past decade, the director pours over the war on drugs, looking at each and every angle. It began under President Nixon, picked up under Reagan, and is presently at a critical point. Jarecki's documentary is fascinating and, with so much information, viewers will feel as though “The House I Live In” could have weighed in way past its 108 minutes. Jarecki also provides a remarkable perspective, tracking stories in more than 20 states with plenty of experts at his disposal. “The House I Live In” is an eye-opening experience, and it's no stretch to call it a must-see documentary. Special features are pretty good, too, as Jarecki offers extended takes on some of the film's topics, including private prisons, mandatory sentences and law enforcement. 4 Stars.

“Inescapable” (2012, R, 93 min., $24.98). Ruba Nadda wrote and directed this international thriller about a Syrian man, who fled the county under suspicious circumstances, returning to Damascus to find his missing journalist daughter. The film stars Marisa Tomei, Alexander Siddig and Joshua Jackson.

“The Girl” (2012, PG-13, 95 min., $19.99). Written and directed by David Riker, “The Girl” stars Abbie Cornish and Will Patton in a drama about a hard-working young woman trying to prove to social services that she can care for her son. When her alcoholic father comes back into her life, her goals are put aside for a real opportunity.

“Blood Runs Cold” (2011, NR, 80 min., $14.93). A thriving musician returns to her rural hometown for a much-needed break, but, instead, comes face-to-face with bloodthirsty killer in this film that's best described as a slasher pic. The trouble starts when Winona (Hanna Oldenburg) returns to her cabin with some old friends.

“Tai Chi Hero” (2012, NR, 100 min., $24.98). Director Sammo Hung is the filmmaker behind this high-flying martial arts epic that stands as the second leg of an action-packed trilogy. Hung's film takes the viewer to Chen Village, where a young Tai Chi artist is trying to make his way in a place that doesn't recognize his fighting style.

“Death By China” (2012, NR, 78 min., $13.99). A winner of multiple awards on the festival circuit, Harvard-trained economist Peter Navarro's documentary explores the rough relationship between the United States and China, and how fractured it's become. Narrated by Martin Sheen, the film offers plenty of insight in its presentation,

“A Place at the Table” (2012, PG, 84 min., $26.98). Documentary filmmakers Kristi Jacobson and Lori Silverbush explore the problems of hunger in the United States, and look for a solution to a gigantic problem that affects 50 million people. Jeff Bridges lends his talent to the picture.

“Constitution USA with Peter Sagal” (2013, NR, 240 min., $29.99). NPR host Peter Sagal travels across the country — from Tyler, Texas, to Cranston, Rhode Island — to discuss America's most important document in this patriotic miniseries from PBS. Sagal is set on finding everyday Americans' feelings on the Constitution.

“Into the White” (2012, R, 104 min., $26.98). Rival fighter pilots are forced to work together when their planes are shot down over a frozen mountainous region of Norway. Taught to dispatch their enemy at all costs, these men, instead, realize the only way to survive is by working as a team. Rupert Grint and Stig Henrik Hoff star.

TV ON DVD

“Breaking Bad: The Fifth Season” (Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul, three discs, eight discs, $55.99)

“House of Cards: The Complete First Season” (Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright, four discs, 13 episodes, $55.99)

 

 

 
 


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