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A shot of warmth found in 'Share'

| Thursday, April 25, 2013, 8:55 p.m.

A barrel of whisky would usually spell doom for the working-class blokes who always find their way into Ken Loach films. But it is redemption the director and his longtime creative collaborator, writer Paul Laverty, have in mind in the un-expectedly warm, hopeful and humorous brew of “The Angels' Share.”

It is a mess of a life the filmmakers have given Robbie (excellent newcomer Paul Brannigan). He's a Glasgow, Scotland, lad well on his way to repeating the sins of his father. Choice and fate have Robbie embroiled in a long-running family feud; its genesis long forgotten, its rage spilling over into ongoing street fights.

That's not, however, what has put Robbie in the courtroom in the film's opening moments. To the caustic judge, Robbie is nothing more than another local thug hauled in for a bad night. With Robbie's pregnant girlfriend looking on, the judge decides to give him a second chance — 300 hours of community service, rather than jail.

This is a movie steeped in second chances. Robbie's girlfriend Leonie (Siobhan Reilly) is one who sees the possibilities in him. But the real game-changer comes from the two new men in his life — the “wee man” Leonie soon gives birth to and the much more-formidable one in Harry (John Henshaw), who runs the community service crew Robbie's assigned to.

Harry's not as hard as he seems and, in Henshaw's hands, he's downright lovable. Harry's fond of old malt whisky, and equally fond of the young thugs in his charge, so he can't help but mix the two. Soon, he's decided to expose them to a little culture in the form of a whisky-tasting.

As they set out for the Edinburgh tasting, the emotional journey gets underway as well. Loach and Laverty use it to get at the current unemployment crisis for the United Kingdom's youth, which has reached an all-time high.

He and his mates are unlikely whisky aficionados to say the least. The twist is the way in which the world of whisky begins to alter their prospects.

Robbie turns out to have a real nose for it. He catches the eye of Thaddeus (Roger Allam), a high-end broker and slick operator, and earns the appreciation of whisky expert Rory McAllister (deliciously played by a real expert in Charlie Maclean).

At times, the film is as rough around the edges as its central characters. But shots of the stunning Scottish Highlands, glimpses inside some of the region's finest distilleries, a hilarious riff on the realities of kilts and Brannigan's rawly moving turn as Robbie, like a wee dram of the good stuff in “The Angels' Share,” leave a warm glow.

Betsy Sharkey is a film critic for the Los Angeles Times.

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