TribLIVE

| AandE


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

'Epic' aims high, achieves … middlin'

‘Epic'

★★1⁄2 (out of 4)

PG

Wide release

Pittsburgher movie quiz for yunz

Is 'Birdman' star Michael Keaton the best actor with western Pennsylvania ties? Click here to play the Trib's tongue-in-cheek attempt to find out.

By Roger Moore
Thursday, May 23, 2013, 8:55 p.m.
 

“Epic” is a children's animated film that is more entertaining and emotional than it has any right to be.

Characters make sacrifices and die, miss their parents and mourn. And we're touched. At least a little. Hard (if over-familiar) lessons are learned and laughs land on queue. Throw in some truly gorgeous animation and Blue Sky, the studio that made it, delivers more proof that it's moved on from the junky cash-machine “Ice Age” movies.

Taking characters from William Joyce children's novel about “Leaf Men” and “Brave Good Bugs,” a team of writers has borrowed from “Antz” and “A Bug's Life,” and even “The Spiderwick Chronicles,” for a story about the fairy forces of life in a forest, the Leaf Men (and women) and their allies, in battle with the rotting reptilian bog-dwelling forces of decay.

A dotty scientist has surveillance cameras covering the forest where this struggle is going on and suspects there are little people out there, riding into battle on hummingbirds and crows, armored and armed with bows and arrows.

But it's his daughter, M.K. (Amanda Seyfried), who finds the proof. That happens when she's magically shrunk by the Queen (Beyonce Knowles) and tasked with ensuring that this one lily pod blooms and renews life by the light of the full moon.

M.K. struggles to survive this brave (tiny) new world, where warriors like the rebellious Nod (Josh Hutcherson) and mission-focused Ronin (Colin Farrell) must fend off the reptilian designs of Mandrake (Christoph Waltz), who is determined to upset the balance between new life and decay and thus take over the forest.

M.K. is assisted in her quest by a very funny snail and a slug (Chris O'Dowd, Aziz Ansari), who know how to keep the pod alive until it blooms. And they are guided by the daffy six-legged Nim (Steven Tyler).

The film's 3-D makes excellent use of depth of field, delivering eye-popping next generation animation.

“Epic” isn't epic, but it isn't half-bad, either. It's just that a strong story is worth more than any next-generation software.

Roger Moore is a movie critic for McClatchy-Tribune News Service.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Movies

  1. Review: ‘Wild Tales’ sinks its teeth into 6 tales of revenge
  2. Review: A teenage girl’s nightmare realized in ‘It Follows’
  3. Review: Salt and pepper don’t add up to enough laughs in ‘Get Hard’
  4. Review: Another E.T. is out of place on Earth in Dreamworks’ ‘Home’
  5. DEC grad to release horror movie filmed at Monessen library
  6. DVD reviews: ‘Into the Woods,’ ‘The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies’ and ‘Unbroken’
  7. ‘Mommy’ displays unconventional, combustible family dynamic
  8. Documentary depicts Aliquippa man’s romantic quest, life with Asperger’s
  9. ‘Gunman’ shows Penn preachy, violent, a bit out-of-date
  10. ‘Insurgent’ diverges from formula enough to give hope
  11. ‘Gett’ is an utterly mesmerizing indictment of patriarchy