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Will 'Last Vegas' become the 'new hip movie'?

| Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, 8:55 p.m.

Think “The Hangover” meets “The Bucket List.”

That's the buzz on “Last Vegas,” starring Michael Douglas, Morgan Freeman, Kevin Kline and Robert De Niro as childhood friends who reunite for a bachelor party in Sin City.

“I hear that, and I say I'm loading the gun now, putting it up against my head,” says director Jon Turteltaub, 50. “It drives me nuts, because it's just such a different movie to me.”

He says his film is getting “typed” unfairly. “There aren't that many that take place in Vegas. And there aren't that many movies with actors this age.” He admits, though, “‘Cocoon' has come up every now and then.”

What he dislikes the most, he says, is that “it implies you're not doing something original.”

But it is about old guys out for one last hurrah right before one of them is about to get married. Craziness ensues, even if it's rated PG-13.

“This movie is rated PG-74,” cracks Turteltaub. Then, he defends it, saying, “It's not a bunch of grandpas in walkers. It's very much not. It's almost like these are four men on the cusp of that part of their life, but still a vibrant part of their life. ... We were always right on the edge of R or PG-13.”

There is one poolside scene in which the four main characters judge a bikini contest. It's not exactly “Hangover's” Mike Tyson and a tiger, but it spices up the movie.

The director puts it in perspective this way: “We are aging better and getting older, and life expectancy is going up. If 50 is the new 40 and 70 is the new 60, hopefully this is the new hip movie!”

And if it has to be tagged, he says he'd pick one of his favorites: “I'd rather it be ‘The Hangover' meets ‘Grumpy Old Men.'”

Ann Oldenburg is a staff writer for USA Today.

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