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Hart, Ice Cube don't do buddy comedies any favors in 'Ride Along'

‘Ride Along'

1⁄2

PG-13

Wide release

By Roger Moore
Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, 8:55 p.m.
 

A little Kevin Hart goes a long way in “Ride Along,” a dull buddy picture engineered as a vehicle for the mini-motormouth Hart and the perma-sneering Ice Cube.

It's mismatched cops on patrol in Atlanta in this “48 Hours” / “Bad Boys” / “Showtime” / “The Hard Way” action comedy where four screenwriters tried to find funny bug-eyed rants for the normally amusing Hart to deliver in between shoot-outs and chases. But as producers of assorted Jim Carrey, Will Ferrell and Eddie Murphy movies could have told them, just pointing the camera at a funny guy is never enough to save a lame, worn-out idea.

Cube, whose career seemed over after one too many “Are We There Yet?” sequels, is cranky cop James, whose pursuit of a mysterious villain named Omar is interrupted by his sister's fiancé. That would be Ben (Hart), a video game-addicted school security guard who longs to bring his wise-cracking / voice-cracking banter to the Atlanta P.D. James drags Ben on a ride-along just to convince the dude he isn't cut out for policework and that he isn't good enough for James' supermodel sister Angela (Tika Sumpter, all legs and shorts and cleavage and hair products).

James figures sis should be dating an Atlanta Falcon, an Atlanta Brave “or even somebody from the Hawks.” Instead, she's hooked up with this sweet-talking shrimp who's “about one chromosome away from being a midget.”

No, James isn't politically correct.

He drags Ben along for a “Training Day” of botched interventions with bikers, silliness at the shooting range and a strip-club shootout. Even by the standards of this well-worn genre, “Ride Along” is lazy, insulting the audience by letting us stay five steps ahead of the hack screenwriters.

At several points, Hart takes center stage, plants his feet and unloads. Often, these ranting monologues run out of gas before they start. His girlish shrieks at the first sign of danger are funnier, but not by much. And you start to wonder if Ice Cube's feigned irritation with him involved any acting at all.

Hart has been funny in concert films and in supporting parts. But, as this film and his boring bit part in “Grudge Match” proved, a little of the little man is pretty much all we can stand unless he finds somebody who can write for him.

Roger Moore is a staff writer for McClatchy-Tribune News Service.

 

 
 


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