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Review: 'Identical' is just like an old school Elvis Musical — in the worst ways

theidenticalmovie.com
Blake Rayne as Ryan Wade in 'The Identical'

‘The Identical'

(out of four)

PG

Wide release

By Roger Moore
Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014, 8:55 p.m.
 

A musical mashup of Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis biography and myth, “The Identical” plays like a failed faith-based “Inside Llewyn Davis.” And that's the closest thing to a compliment it will get.

Built around a too-tall Elvis impersonator, Blake Rayne, it tells the story of fictional twins, separated at birth. One grew up to be Drexel “The Dream” Hemsley, a hard-drinking rocker. His twin, Ryan, raised by a preacher (Ray Liotta) and his wife (Ashley Judd), is pushed toward the ministry.

It's Ryan's life we follow, from his discovery of his singing voice to his refusal to take “the call” to preach to his discovery of African-American “boogie woogie rock 'n' roll.”

Ryan hooks up with a drummer (Seth Green, straining to be funny) and a worshipful garage boss (Joe Pantoliano) and builds a career out of imitating the guy he can't help but notice is his musical and physical dead ringer.

The opening when the babies are split up is filmed in black and white, set in Depression-era Alabama and notable for hurling Liotta at us as maybe the scariest revival preacher this side of a Swaggart.

What follows is a parody of an Elvis musical. See young Ryan croon to his Army buddies. Watch him storm the stage at a miraculously integrated 1950s juke joint. See him avoid drink and cigarettes even as he rebels (mildly) against his daddy's Bible school wishes and pursues the fresh-faced prom queen (Erin Cottrell).

For anyone familiar with Elvis movies, all that's missing here is the fistfight.

But that would have implied conflict, and conflict creates drama, both of which “The Identical” lacks. Screenwriter Howard “Grace Card” Klausner's dialogue is too corny to call corny. Rock 'n' roll? “It's just a fad.” Listen for the anachronisms, a 1950s mechanic preaching “pump up the volume,” a 1960s MC promising to “rock you like a hurricane.”

It's wholesome, sure. They guaranteed that by focusing on Ryan's story and not Drexel's. Drexel was the one having all the fun.

The best you can say about it is that the established players — Judd, Liotta and Green — don't embarrass themselves, and the vintage settings and cars look right — even if details, in scene after scene, feel a little off.

If they wanted to parody an Elvis movie, they succeeded. It's every bit as misguided and maddening, almost “Identical,” you could say.

Roger Moore reviews movies for McClatchy News Service.

 

 
 


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