ShareThis Page
Art & Museums

Temporary closure: Fort Pitt Museum to close while it receives a few upgrades and additions beginning Jan. 1

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2017, 12:33 p.m.
The Fort Pitt Museum, located in Point State Park in Pittsburgh, part of the Senator John Heinz History Center museum system, will temporarily close beginning Jan. 1 for exhibition maintenance and updates. The museum will reopen to the public on Jan. 27. During the temporary closure, museum curators will clean the iconic diorama depicting The Point in the 1760s.
COURTESTY FORT PITT MUSEUM
The Fort Pitt Museum, located in Point State Park in Pittsburgh, part of the Senator John Heinz History Center museum system, will temporarily close beginning Jan. 1 for exhibition maintenance and updates. The museum will reopen to the public on Jan. 27. During the temporary closure, museum curators will clean the iconic diorama depicting The Point in the 1760s.

The Fort Pitt Museum, located in Point State Park in Pittsburgh, part of the Senator John Heinz History Center museum system, will temporarily close beginning Jan. 1 for exhibition maintenance and updates. The museum will reopen to the public on Jan. 27.

During the temporary closure, museum curators will clean the iconic diorama depicting The Point in the 1760s. Several newly acquired 18th century loan objects will be placed on display, including a horn spoon once belonging to Catharine Bard, a former captive of the Delaware tribe in the mid-1700s, and an original 18th century French trade pistol.

This time will also be used for planning of events, such as speaker series, living history demonstrations, educational outreach, scout workshops, and activities commemorating the 240th anniversary of the Fort Pitt Treaty of 1778.

The museum's featured exhibition is "From Maps to Mermaids: Carved Powder Horns in Early America." It features delicately-carved powder horns – used by soldiers, settlers, and American Indians to store gunpowder – and the stories behind them.

The Fort Pitt Museum, which attracted more than 55,000 visitors last year, is built in a recreated bastion of the British fort originally constructed in 1759. It focuses on the critical role that Western Pennsylvania played during the French & Indian War, the American Revolution and the founding of Pittsburgh.

Details: 412-281-9284 or heinzhistorycenter.org

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me