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Art & Museums

Museum to unveil Tarentum Glass donation

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018, 8:55 p.m.

Five boxes are patiently waiting to be opened at Alle-Kiski Valley Historical Society Heritage Museum in Tarentum.

Inside is a collection of glass vases, bowls, cups and plates manufactured by Tarentum Glass Co., some dating back to the 1890s.

The glassware will be unveiled at the Tarentum Glass Unwrapping Party at 2 p.m. Jan. 28 at the museum.

The 100-piece collection was donated by a man from Massachusetts who wishes to remain anonymous. He is a Harvard graduate who contacted the museum because he was downsizing and doesn't have room for all of the glass he's collected for the past 50 years.

All of the pieces are from the Harvard Yard pattern created by Tarentum Glass, and since they were made in Tarentum, the donor felt it would be the best place for them to reside. He made sure each piece was individually wrapped, paid for them to be shipped in November, and also gave money to help build a case for the pieces.

Each piece will be carefully unpacked and unwrapped to unveil the treasures tucked inside. Each will be discussed, as will stories of Tarentum's rich glass industry be shared.

“We will un-box them during the event,” says Jim Thomas, president of the Alle-Kiski Valley Historical Society board. “That will be the exciting part, because we don't know what is inside the boxes.”

If there are duplicates, Thomas says they could be sold.

Tarentum Glass Co. began operations in the late 1800s and closed in 1918.

The unwrapping starts at 2 p.m. Jan. 28 at the museum at 224 East 7th Ave. A $5 donation is suggested. Details: 724-224-7666 or akvhs.org

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

Pieces of glass from the collection of a Harvard graduate who donated 100 pieces to the Alle-Kiski Valley Historical Society Heritage Museum in Tarentum. The glass items, orignally made in Tarentum and from the Harvard Pattern line, will be unveiled at 2 p.m. Jan. 28 at the museum.
Pieces of glass from the collection of a Harvard graduate who donated 100 pieces to the Alle-Kiski Valley Historical Society Heritage Museum in Tarentum. The glass items, orignally made in Tarentum and from the Harvard Pattern line, will be unveiled at 2 p.m. Jan. 28 at the museum.
This glass vase is from the collection of a Harvard graduate who donated 100 pieces to the Alle-Kiski Valley Historical Society Heritage Museum in Tarentum. The glass items, orignally made in Tarentum and from the Harvard Pattern line, will be unveiled at 2 p.m. Jan. 28 at the museum.
JOANNE KLIMOVICH HARROP
This glass vase is from the collection of a Harvard graduate who donated 100 pieces to the Alle-Kiski Valley Historical Society Heritage Museum in Tarentum. The glass items, orignally made in Tarentum and from the Harvard Pattern line, will be unveiled at 2 p.m. Jan. 28 at the museum.
Pieces of glass from the collection of a Harvard graduate who donated 100 pieces to the Alle-Kiski Valley Historical Society Heritage Museum in Tarentum. The glass items, orignally made in Tarentum and from the Harvard Pattern line, will be unveiled at 2 p.m. Jan. 28 at the museum.
JOANNE KLIMOVICH HARROP
Pieces of glass from the collection of a Harvard graduate who donated 100 pieces to the Alle-Kiski Valley Historical Society Heritage Museum in Tarentum. The glass items, orignally made in Tarentum and from the Harvard Pattern line, will be unveiled at 2 p.m. Jan. 28 at the museum.
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