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Art & Museums

Happy birthday, Honest Abe! Here are a few ways to celebrate our 16th president

Shirley McMarlin
| Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, 12:12 p.m.
In this 2014 photo, a mammoth platinum print of Abraham Lincoln, taken in 1860 by photographer Alexander Hesler, is held by Photo Antiquities' owner Bruce Klein (left) and Frank Watters at the photography museum on Pittsburgh's North Side. A 'Lincoln in Pittsburgh' exhibit is running through April at Photo Antiquities.
James Knox | Tribune-Review
In this 2014 photo, a mammoth platinum print of Abraham Lincoln, taken in 1860 by photographer Alexander Hesler, is held by Photo Antiquities' owner Bruce Klein (left) and Frank Watters at the photography museum on Pittsburgh's North Side. A 'Lincoln in Pittsburgh' exhibit is running through April at Photo Antiquities.

Abraham Lincoln was born Feb. 12, 1809, on a farm near Hodgenville, Ky., making 2018 the 209th anniversary of his birth. Here are some options for commemorating the birth of the 16th president of these United States, who preserved the Union during the U.S. Civil War and brought about the abolition of slavery:

‘Lincoln in Pittsburgh'

This exhibit of vintage photographs and documents is running through April at the Photo Antiquities Museum of Photographic History, in Pittsburgh's North Side.

Artifacts from “Lincoln in Pittsburgh” include the last check written by Lincoln before he met his fate at Ford's Theater, a large oil painting of Lincoln by A.F. King, after a Mathew Brady photograph; a quarter-plate daguerreotype copy of Alexander Hesler's 1860 portrait of Lincoln; texts of the Gettysburg Address, including a copper plaque and copies signed by political figures; along with various period prints of Lincoln.

The museum is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays through Saturdays at 531 E. Ohio St.

Details: 412-231-7881 or photoantiquities.org

Aaron Copland's ‘Lincoln Portrait'

Composed in 1942, Copland's haunting orchestral score incorporates some of Lincoln's most stirring oratory spoken over the music.

Christopher B. Howard, president of Robert Morris University, will provide narration to music by Duquesne University's Wind Symphony for a program at 7 p.m. Feb. 19 in the Andrew Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie.

Concertgoers also will have access to the library's Captain Thomas Espy Post of the Grand Army of the Republic and Lincoln Gallery, featuring a rare collection of 100 photographs of “Honest Abe.”

Tickets are $20, $15 in advance, $5 for ages 12 and under.

Details: 412-276-3456 or carnegiecarnegie.org

Gettysburg Address

Just 272 words long, the speech Lincoln gave on the battlefield in Gettysburg is inscribed not only in the American memory but also on the auditorium wall of Soldiers and Sailors Hall in Oakland.

In remembrance of Lincoln, visitors also can peruse Soldiers and Sailors' Gettysburg Room, which contains authentic artifacts from the 1863 Civil War battle, which stopped the Confederate army's second invasion of the north and turned the tide for the Union Army.

The museum is open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays (closed Feb. 17), with extended hours until 8 p.m. Thursdays at 4141 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh.

Details: 412-621-4253 or soldiersandsailorshall.org

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