ShareThis Page
Art & Museums

Garfield art gallery will highlight Carnegie Mellon students' work

Patrick Varine
| Wednesday, May 2, 2018, 5:54 p.m.
Above, Kasem Kydd's 'We Really Out Here (When The Squad Links Up Against The Militarized Police).' Kydd is one of three Carnegie Mellon art students whose work will be on display through May 27 at the Bunker Projects gallery in Bloomfield.
Artwork by Kasem Kydd
Above, Kasem Kydd's 'We Really Out Here (When The Squad Links Up Against The Militarized Police).' Kydd is one of three Carnegie Mellon art students whose work will be on display through May 27 at the Bunker Projects gallery in Bloomfield.

Carnegie Mellon University art students Jenna Kay Houston, Kasem Kydd and Gray Swartzel will be featured at the Bunker Projects gallery in Pittsburgh.

An opening reception for the “Blue Like Fortune” exhibit will run from 6 to 10 p.m. on Friday, May 4, at the gallery, 5106 Penn Avenue in the city's Garfield neighborhood.

Each artist has a unique vision for their work.

“My practice emphasizes creating queer possibilities out of the mundane and typical,” Houston says in her artist biography. “What makes an object queer? What about a person? A place? I answer these questions through my photographs and video shot through a nonbinary femme lens to provide complex and quiet alternatives to one-sided mainstream representation of queer communities.”

For Kydd , born in Brooklyn, New York, his art is expression of “veryifying my own existence and ontology as a black person living in the wake of slavery during the 21st century.”

“I have always been enamored with the possibilities of science fiction and the potential to rewrite histories and create possible futures that are acting as forms of resistance to the white settler society I am occupying,” he says in his artist biography. “I think the parallels between the ocean and space as “frontiers” are compelling paradigms of domination but the history and present nature of the ocean has always been political and in terms of my existence, rooted in race.”

Both Houston and Kydd will graduate this spring with bachelor's degrees. Swartzel , from Raleigh, N.C., will earn his master's degree at graduation.

Using still and moving images, as well as installation, Swartzel “reconstitutes the often-untold episodes of his family's matrilineage to make physical the conceptions of connectedness and isolation,” according to his bio.

“Blue Like Fortune” will run through May 27.

For more, see the Bunker Projects website .

Patrick Varine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-2862, pvarine@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MurrysvilleStar.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me