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Gift adds works to Westmoreland Museum of American Art

Westmoreland Museum of American Art - “A Stitch in Time,” by Harry Roseland (1866-1950). Donated to the Westmoreland Museum of American Art by Richard Scaife.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Westmoreland Museum of American Art</em></div>“A Stitch in Time,” by Harry Roseland (1866-1950). Donated to the Westmoreland Museum of American Art by Richard Scaife.
Westmoreland Museum of American Art - “Fishing on Lake George,” 1877, by Charles Henry Gifford (1839-1904). Donated to the Westmoreland Museum of American Art by Richard Scaife.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Westmoreland Museum of American Art</em></div>“Fishing on Lake George,” 1877, by Charles Henry Gifford (1839-1904). Donated to the Westmoreland Museum of American Art by Richard Scaife.
Monday, May 13, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

Philanthropist Richard M. Scaife has purchased two paintings for the collection of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art.

“A Stitch in Time,” by Harry Roseland (1866-1950), is an oil-on-canvas measuring 24 inches by 18 inches; and “Fishing on Lake George,” 1877, by Charles Henry Gifford (1839-1904), is an oil-on-canvas measuring 12 inches by 20 inches.

Scaife, Trib Total Media publisher, gave “Fishing on Lake George” in honor of Director/CEO Judith H. O'Toole's 20 years of service at the Westmoreland.

“Mr. Scaife has contributed greatly to the Westmoreland's collections over the years,” O'Toole says. “These new gifts represent a strengthening in two areas: artists of the important 19th-century American movement known as the Hudson River School and American genre painting representing scenes of everyday life.”

Roseland was one of America's finest genre painters during the 19th and early 20th centuries. His most widely known compositions focused on the lives of blacks, and most were set in the South.

Gifford was a Luminist painter, concerned with subtle and dramatic effects of light, stillness and softly glowing surfaces. He painted along the New England coast, including Nantucket, Cuttyhunk and the Elizabeth Islands, and inland to the White Mountains, Niagara Falls and Lake George.

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