ShareThis Page

Pittsburgh rapper Mac Miller comes home to start his tour

| Friday, Sept. 16, 2016, 5:45 p.m.
Jack Fordyce | Tribune - Review
Mac Miller kicked off his tour with a hometown performance in Pittsburgh Sunday, September 18 at Stage AE. Miller is currently touring in support of his latest album, ÒThe Divine Feminine,Ó released on September 16.
Jack Fordyce | Tribune - Review
Mac Miller kicked off his tour with a hometown performance in Pittsburgh Sunday, September 18 at Stage AE. Miller is currently touring in support of his latest album, “The Divine Feminine,” released on September 16.
Jack Fordyce | Tribune - Review
Mac Miller kicked off his tour with a hometown performance in Pittsburgh Sunday, September 18 at Stage AE. Miller is currently touring in support of his latest album, “The Divine Feminine,” released on September 16.
Jack Fordyce | Tribune - Review
Mac Miller kicked off his tour with a hometown performance in Pittsburgh Sunday, September 18 at Stage AE. Miller is currently touring in support of his latest album, “The Divine Feminine,” released on September 16.
Jack Fordyce | Tribune - Review
Mac Miller kicked off his tour with a hometown performance in Pittsburgh Sunday, September 18 at Stage AE. Miller is currently touring in support of his latest album, “The Divine Feminine,” released on September 16.
Jack Fordyce | Tribune - Review
Mac Miller kicked off his tour with a hometown performance in Pittsburgh Sunday, September 18 at Stage AE. Miller is currently touring in support of his latest album, “The Divine Feminine,” released on September 16.
Jack Fordyce | Tribune - Review
Mac Miller kicked off his tour with a hometown performance in Pittsburgh Sunday, September 18 at Stage AE. Miller is currently touring in support of his latest album, “The Divine Feminine,” released on September 16.
Jack Fordyce | Tribune - Review
Mac Miller kicked off his tour with a hometown performance in Pittsburgh Sunday, September 18 at Stage AE. Miller is currently touring in support of his latest album, “The Divine Feminine,” released on September 16.
Chaz Palla | Trib Total Media
Performing artist Mac Miller leads the towel wave before the start of the Steelers-49ers game Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, at Heinz Field.
Jack Fordyce | Tribune-Review
Mac Miller started his show with 'Loud' to kickoff the Good AM tour in Pittsburgh on Sunday, September 20, 2015, at Stage AE.

Mac Miller is in love. With women.

Women in general.

His new album, “The Divine Feminine,” which was released Sept. 16, is “all songs about love, in every aspect.”

Of course, the elephant in the room (a very tiny elephant) is the girl he's been collaborating with most frequently, Ariana Grande.

“It's great,” he says. “We have a lot of fun in the studio.”

So ... he's still being coy about that, mostly. The Point Breeze native and Allderdice High School grad will be in Pittsburgh on Sept. 18 to kick off his tour with a show at Stage AE on the North Shore.

“I'm always back in Pittsburgh,” Miller says. “It's home. I was just there a few weekends ago. It's amazing. There's an unmatched feeling about being at home.

“Pittsburgh keeps on evolving and becoming more awesome. It never loses that feeling ... of, like, taking a deep breath.”

Miller reportedly signed to Warner Bros. in 2014 for $10 million. Before that, he concentrated on his own independent label, REMember Music, and early on, Pittsburgh-based indie label Rostrum Records.

When asked if money buys happiness, Miller says, “When you don't have a lot of money, you always have to think about it. I don't have to think about it, and that's a blessing.”

Miller likes to perform — a lot — but he'd rather be tinkering around in the studio. Not everybody knows that in addition to rapping, he's a self-taught musician who plays piano, guitar, drums and bass.

“It's my favorite place to be, ever,” Miller says. “I try not to be in there for the types of hours I used to be, but I always keep a recording studio close. Yeah, I just want to continue to keep getting better as a musician. I'm trying to become a better piano player, better guitar player, and experimenting a lot with playing every instrument on songs. I love music.”

Live, he lets other do the work — for the most part.

“I'll bring out a piano sometimes and a guitar,” Miller says. “There's a time and place for everything. Performing with a live band is one of my favorite things ever, but it's not for every show.”

Another thing he loves is pseudo‑nyms. Mac Miller is an alias (growing up in Pittsburgh, his name was Malcolm James McCormick). He also goes by names such as Larry Fisherman, Delusional Thomas, Larry Lovestein and The Velvet Revival.

“Sometimes, reality seems constricting,” Miller says. “So creating characters and stuff allows you to just kind of go to new places with your music.”

Michael Machosky is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7901or mmachosky@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.