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Timberlake is a winner in the Super Bowl LII halftime show

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Sunday, Feb. 4, 2018, 9:10 p.m.
Justin Timberlake performs on stage during the Super Bowl LII halftime show at the US Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota February 4, 2018.
AFP/Getty Images
Justin Timberlake performs on stage during the Super Bowl LII halftime show at the US Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota February 4, 2018.
Justin Timberlake performs at Super Bowl LII in Minneapolis, MN.
JOANNE KLIMOVICH HARROP
Justin Timberlake performs at Super Bowl LII in Minneapolis, MN.
Recording artist Justin Timberlake performs onstage during the Pepsi Super Bowl LII Halftime Show at U.S. Bank Stadium on Feb. 4, 2018 in Minneapolis.
Getty Images
Recording artist Justin Timberlake performs onstage during the Pepsi Super Bowl LII Halftime Show at U.S. Bank Stadium on Feb. 4, 2018 in Minneapolis.

Justin Timberlake won the halftime show with his 13-minute performance during the National Football League's Super Bowl LII on Feb. 4 at U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minn.

He had the packed house dancing and singing and reminiscing with a tribute in memoriam to the city's beloved Prince. Timberlake played a white piano which turned a purple hue as he said, "This one's for you Minneapolis," and sang "I Would Die 4U," a classic by the one and only Prince with the icon's photo displayed.

Timberlake entered the stadium via a pair of steps and donned a camouflaged outfit, and leather jacket with fringe and a red scarf. He showed off his dance moves on the NFL logo at the 50-yard line. Songs included "Rock Your Body," "Can't Stop the Feeling" and "SexyBack." He invited fans to turn on their smartphones and light up the night. They accomodated him and he said, "You look so beautiful."

This is Timberlake's third appearance performing at the big game. The second was in 2004, which included the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" with Janet Jackson, and the first was in 2001 as a member of the boy band 'NSync. The NFL doesn't pay talent for this halftime show according to time.com. Expenses and productions costs are covered.

The 10-time Grammy-award winner posted this an hour before game time

He honored Prince, in his hometown, but decided against using a hologram of the late star, who spoke out against performing with holograms of deceased stars.

There is even a drink to commemorate Timberlake's performance.

Super Bowl halftime show sponsor Pepsi has been giving away prizes all day.

His performance was anticipated to be one of the best.

Timberlake has had a rocky history with this halftime gig, especially with that 2004 performance with Jackson and the wardrobe malfunction.

If this show wasn't enough of Timberlake, catch him live on Jimmy Fallon tonight after the Super Bowl and a pivotal episode of "This is Us."

Or attend Timberlake's "The Man Of The Woods Tour," on June 1 at Pittsburgh's PPG Paints Arena.

Timberlake's album, "Man Of The Woods," was released Feb. 2.

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-853-5062 or jharrop@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Jharrop_Trib.

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