ShareThis Page
Music

Is it Bach or Beethoven? Find out during Latrobe library course

Shirley McMarlin
| Monday, May 14, 2018, 12:24 p.m.
Is it Beethoven or Bach? Classical Encounters class at Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe will introduce participants to classic music periods and composers. (And this is Beethoven.)
Pixabay
Is it Beethoven or Bach? Classical Encounters class at Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe will introduce participants to classic music periods and composers. (And this is Beethoven.)
Morrie Brand will teach a Classical Encounters music appreciation course beginning May 31 in Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe. Brand is director of the Westmoreland Symphony’s Academy of Music and music director of the Westmoreland Youth Symphony Orchestra.
Tribune-Review
Morrie Brand will teach a Classical Encounters music appreciation course beginning May 31 in Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe. Brand is director of the Westmoreland Symphony’s Academy of Music and music director of the Westmoreland Youth Symphony Orchestra.

If you can't tell your Beethoven from your Bach, Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe has a class for you.

Classical Encounters With Morrie Brand, a four-week music appreciation course, will begin at 6 p.m. May 31 in the library at 1112 Ligonier St.

Instructor Brand is director of the Westmoreland Symphony's Academy of Music and music director of the Westmoreland Youth Symphony Orchestra.

The course can serve as either an introduction or refresher course in classical music. It introduces participants to composers and also traces the development of the orchestra, Brand says.

Sessions will explore the four basic periods of classical music:

Baroque, 1600-1750: Pieces with a single, but layered, melodic idea composed for strings, winds and harpsichord with very little percussion. “It's a very vigorous style of playing,” Brand says. Notable Baroque composers: Bach, Handel and Vivaldi.

Classical, 1750-1825: Lighter and less complex than Baroque, with a clear melody above subordinate chordal accompaniment. “Hayden is the one who set it in motion,” Brand says. Other influential Classical composers: Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert.

Romantic, 1825-1900: The more rigid form of Classical music gave way to freer expression, intense energy and passion. “The Romantics were most interested in telling stories with their music,” Brand says. Most popular Romantic composer: Tchaikovsky.

Contemporary, 1900-present: Covers a variety of compositional styles, from experiments with dissonance and atonalism to a return to principles associated with classicism, such as order, balance and emotional restraint. “It's broken up into many forms: impressionism, neoclassicism, minimalism, among others,” Brand says. Notable Contemporary composers: Copland and Stravinsky.

Brand says he's taught the material to various groups over the years.

“One of the exciting things is that there's been a thirst for this kind of class,” he says. “It's meant for people who know a little about classical music, but we get many who are quite knowledgeable too. The class helps them organize what the know, and they can share their knowledge with others.”

Class participants are asked to commit to all four sessions, says Laura Starzynski, the library's adult events coordinator. Registration and a $10 deposit are required; the deposit is refunded to those who attend all four classes.

Information and registration: 724-539-1972

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5750, smcmarlin@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shirley_trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me