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Campbell's career rehash is strictly for completists

| Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, 12:36 a.m.

‘See You There'

Glen Campbell (Surfdog)

★★★

When legendary artist Glen Campbell was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2011, the excellent “Ghost on the Canvas” was billed as his farewell album. Uh, guess not. Turns out Campbell also recorded new versions of some of his older songs during the “Ghost” sessions, and “See You There” is the result.

It's not a bad record, but I'm not sure there was a need for new versions of “Gentle on My Mind,” “Rhinestone Cowboy,” “Wichita Lineman,” “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” and “Galveston,” much less “Ghost” bonus tracks “What I Wouldn't Give” and “I Wish You Were Here.” For completists only.

‘Just One of Them Nights'

Fruition (self-released)

★★★★½

If you're a fan of folksy Americana music with a touch of string band thrown in for good measure, then newcomer Fruition is just what the doctor ordered. The Oregon-based band's “Just One of Them Nights” is a revelation, as the five former street musicians churn out an 11-track platter that's remarkable in its consistency. With Jay Cobb Anderson and Mimi Naja sharing lead vocals and the rest of the outfit contributing layered harmonies, it's easy to get swept away by Fruition. Keepers abound, including “Git Along,” “Whippoorwill,” “Mountain Annie,” “The Wanter,” the title track, “Boil Over” and “Gotta Get Back Home.” Highly recommended.

Jeffrey Sisk is an editor for Trib Total Media. Reach him at 412-664-9161 ext. 1952, or jsisk@tribweb.com.

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